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1 Corinthians 10:11

    1 Corinthians 10:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Now all these things happened to them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, on whom the ends of the world are come.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now these things happened unto them by way of example; and they were written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages are come.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now these things were done as an example; and were put down in writing for our teaching, on whom the last days have come.

    Webster's Revision

    Now these things happened unto them by way of example; and they were written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages are come.

    World English Bible

    Now all these things happened to them by way of example, and they were written for our admonition, on whom the ends of the ages have come.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now these things happened unto them by way of example; and they were written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages are come.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 10:11

    Admonition - Instruction.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:11

    Upon whom the ends of the world are come - Τα τελη των αιωνων· The end of the times included within the whole duration of the Mosaic economy. For although the word αιων means, in its primary sense, endless being, or duration; yet, in its accommodated sense, it is applied to any round or duration that is complete in itself: and here it evidently means the whole duration of the Mosaic economy. "Thus, therefore," says Dr. Lightfoot, "the apostle speaks in this place that those things, which were transacted in the beginning of the Jewish ages, are written for an example to you upon whom the ends of those ages are come; and the beginning is like to the end, and the end to the beginning. Both were forty years; both consisted of temptation and unbelief; and both ended in the destruction of the unbelievers - that, in the destruction of those who perished in the wilderness; this, in the destruction of those that believed not: viz. the destruction of their city and nation." The phrase סוף יומיא soph yomaiya, the end of days, says the Targum of Jerusalem, Genesis 3:15, means ביומוי דמלכא משיחא beyomoi demalca Meshicha, in the days of the King Messiah. We are to consider the apostle's words as referring to the end of the Jewish dispensation and the commencement of the Christian, which is the last dispensation which God will vouchsafe to man in the state of probation.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:11

    For ensamples - Greek: "types" (τύποι tupoi). The same word which is used in 1 Corinthians 10:6. This verse is a repetition of the admonition contained in that verse, in order to impress it more deeply on the memory; see the note at 1 Corinthians 10:6. The sense is, not that these things took place simply and solely to be examples, or admonitions, but that their occurrence illustrated great principles of human nature and of the divine government; they showed the weakness of men, and their liability to fall into sin, and their need of the divine protection, and they might thus be used for the admonition of succeeding generations.

    They are written for our admonition - They are recorded in the writings of Moses, in order that we and all others might be admonished not to confide in our own strength. The admonition did not pertain merely to the Corinthians, but had an equal applicability to Christians in all ages of the world.

    Upon whom the ends of the world are come - This expression is equivalent to that which so often occurs in the Scriptures, as, "the last time," "the latter day," etc.; see it fully explained in the notes on Acts 2:17. It means the last dispensation; or, that period and mode of the divine administration under which the affairs of the world would be wound up. There would be no mode of administration beyond that of the gospel. But it by no means denotes necessarily that the continuance of this period called "the last times," and "the ends of the world" would be brief, or that the apostle believed that the world would soon come to an end. It might be the last period, and yet be longer than any one previous period, or than all the previous periods put together. There may be a last dynasty in an empire, and yet it may be longer than any previous dynasty, or than all the previous dynasties put together. The apostle Paul was at special pains in 2 Thessalonians 2 to show, that by affirming that the last time had come, he did not mean that the world would soon come to an end.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:11

    10:11 On whom the ends of the ages are come - The expression has great force. All things meet together, and come to a crisis, under the last, the gospel, dispensation; both benefits and dangers, punishments and rewards. It remains, that Christ come as an avenger and judge. And even these ends include various periods, succeeding each other.