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1 Corinthians 10:12

    1 Corinthians 10:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why let him that thinks he stands take heed lest he fall.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So let him who seems to himself to be safe go in fear of a fall.

    Webster's Revision

    Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.

    World English Bible

    Therefore let him who thinks he stands be careful that he doesn't fall.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 10:12

    Heed - To be careful to consider.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.
    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:12

    Let him that thinketh he standeth - Ὁ δοκων ἑσταναι· Let him who most confidently standeth - him who has the fullest conviction in his own conscience that his heart is right with God, and that his mind is right in the truth, take heed lest he fall from his faith, and from the state of holiness in which the grace of God has placed him. I have already shown that the verb δοκειν, which we render to seem, to think, to suppose, is used by the best Greek writers, not to lessen or weaken the sense, but to render it stronger and more emphatic. See the note on Luke 8:18.

    In a state of probation every thing may change; while we are in this life we may stand or fall: our standing in the faith depends on our union with God; and that depends on our watching unto prayer, and continuing to possess that faith that worketh by love. The highest saint under heaven can stand no longer than he depends upon God and continues in the obedience of faith. He that ceases to do so will fall into sin, and get a darkened understanding and a hardened heart: and he may continue in this state till God come to take away his soul. Therefore, let him who most assuredly standeth, take heed lest he fall; not only partially, but finally.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:12

    Wherefore - As the result of all these admonitions. Let this be the effect of all that we learn from the unhappy self-confidence of the Jews, to admonish us not to put reliance on our own strength.

    That thinketh he standeth - That supposes himself to be firm in the love of God, and in the knowledge of his truth; that regards himself as secure, and that will be therefore disposed to rely on his own strength.

    Take heed lest he fall - Into sin, idolatry, or any other form of iniquity. We learn here:

    (1) That a confidence in our own security is no evidence that we are safe.

    (2) such a confidence may be one of the strongest evidences that we are in danger. Those are most safe who feel that they are weak and feeble, and who feel their need of divine aid and strength. They will then rely on the true source of strength; and they will be secure.

    (3) all professed Christians should be admonished. All are in danger of falling into sin, and of dishonoring their profession; and the exhortation cannot be too often or too urgently pressed, that they should take heed lest they fall into sin. The leading and special idea of the apostle here should not he forgotten or disregarded. It is, that Christians in their favored moments, when they are permitted to approach near to God, and when the joys of salvation fill their hearts, should exercise special caution. For:

    (a) Then the adversary will be especially desirous to draw away their thoughts from God, and to lead them into sin, as their fall would most signally dishonor religion;

    (b) Then they will be less likely to be on their guard, and more likely to feel themselves strong, and not to need caution and solicitude.

    Accordingly, it often happens that Christians, after they have been especially favored with the tokens of the divine favor, soon relapse into their former state, or fall into some sin that grieves the hearts of their brethren, or wounds the cause of religion. So it is in revivals; so it is in individuals. Churches that are thus favored are filled with joy, and love, and peace. Yet they become self-confident and elated; they lose their humility and their sense of their dependence; they cease to be watchful and prayerful, supposing that all is safe; and the result often is, that a season of revival is succeeded by a time of coldness and declension. And thus, too, it is with individuals. Just the opposite effect is produced from what should be, and from what need be. Christians should then be especially on their guard; and if they then availed themselves of their elevated advantages, churches might be favored with continued revivals and ever-growing piety; and individuals might be filled with joy, and peace, and holiness, and ever-expanding and increasing love.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:12

    10:12 The common translation runs, Let him that thinketh he standeth; but the word translated thinketh, most certainly strengthens, rather than weakens, the sense.