Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

1 Corinthians 10:22

    1 Corinthians 10:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Or may we be the cause of envy to the Lord? are we stronger than he?

    Webster's Revision

    Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

    World English Bible

    Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22

    Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? - All idolatry is represented as a sort of spiritual adultery; it is giving that heart to Satan that should be devoted to God; and he is represented as being jealous, because of the infidelity of those who have covenanted to give their hearts to him.

    Are we stronger than he? - As he has threatened to punish such transgressors, and will infallibly do it, can we resist his omnipotence? A sinner should consider, while he is in rebellion against God, whether he be able to resist that power whereby God will inflict vengeance.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:22

    Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? - That is, shall we, by joining in the worship of idols, "provoke" or "irritate" God, or excite him to anger? This is evidently the meaning of the word παραζηλοῦμεν parazēloumen, rendered "provoke to jealousy." The word קנא qaana', usually rendered by this word by the Septuagint, has this sense in Deuteronomy 32:21; 1 Kings 14:22; Ezra 8:3; Psalm 78:58. There is a reference here, doubtless, to the truth recorded in Exodus 20:5. that God "is a jealous God," and that he regards the worship of idols as a direct affront to himself. The sentiment of Paul is, that to join in the worship of idols, or in the observance of their feasts, would be to participate in that which had ever been regarded by God with special abhorrence, and which more than anything else tended to provoke his wrath. We may observe, that any course of life that tends to alienate the affections from God, and to fix them on other beings or objects, is a sin of the same kind as that referred to here. Any inordinate love of friends, of property, of honor, has substantially the same idolatrous nature, and will tend to provoke him to anger. And it may be asked of Christians now, whether they will by such inordinate attachments provoke the Lord to wrath? whether they will thus excite his displeasure, and expose themselves to his indignation? Very often Christians do thus provoke him. They become unduly attached to a friend, or to wealth, and God in anger takes away that friend by death, or that property by the flames, or they conform to the world, and mingle in its scenes of fashion and gaiety, and forget God; and in displeasure he visits them with judgments, humbles them, and recalls them to Himself.

    Are we stronger than he? - This is given as a reason why we should not provoke his displeasure. We cannot contend successfully with Him; and it is therefore madness and folly to contend with God, or to expose ourselves to the effects of His indignation.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:22

    10:22 Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy - By thus caressing his rivals? Are we stronger than he - Are we able to resist, or to bear his wrath?