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1 Corinthians 10:7

    1 Corinthians 10:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Neither be you idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then do not go after false gods, as some of them did; as it is said in the holy Writings, After resting and feasting, the people got up to take their pleasure.

    Webster's Revision

    Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    World English Bible

    Neither be idolaters, as some of them were. As it is written, "The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:7

    Neither be ye idolaters - The apostle considers partaking of the idolatrous feasts as being real acts of idolatry; because those who offered the flesh to their gods considered them as feeding invisibly with them on the flesh thus offered, and that every one that partook of the feast was a real participator with the god to whom the flesh or animal had been offered in sacrifice. See 1 Corinthians 10:21.

    Rose up to play - See the note on Exodus 32:6. The Jews generally explain this word as implying idolatrous acts only: I have considered it as implying acts of impurity, with which idolatrous acts were often accompanied. It also means those dances which were practised in honor of their gods. That this is one meaning of the verb παιζειν, Kypke has largely proved. The whole idolatrous process was as follows:

    1. The proper victim was prepared and set apart.

    2. It was slain, and its blood poured out at the altar of the deity.

    3. The flesh was dressed, and the priests and offerers feasted on it, and thus endeavored to establish a communion between themselves and the object of their worship.

    4. After eating, they had idolatrous dances in honor of their god; and,

    5. as might be expected, impure mixtures, in consequence of those dances. The people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play; and it is in reference to this issue of idolatrous feasts and dancings that the apostle immediately subjoins: Neither let us commit Fornication, etc.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:7

    Neither be ye idolaters - This caution is evidently given in view of the danger to which they would be exposed if they partook of the feasts that were celebrated in honor of idols in their temples. The particular idolatry which is referred to here is, the worship of the golden calf that was made by Aaron Exodus 32:1-5.

    As it is written - Exodus 32:6.

    The people sat down to eat and to drink - To worship the golden calf. They partook of a feast in honor of that idol. I have already observed that it was common to keep a feast in honor of an idol, and that the food which was eaten on such an occasion was mainly the meat which had been offered in sacrifice to it. This instance was particularly to the apostle's purpose, as he was cautioning the Corinthians against the danger of participating in the feasts celebrated in the pagan temples.

    And rose up to play - (παίζειν paizein). The Hebrew word used in Exodus 32:6 (צחק tsaachaq) means "to laugh, to sport, to jest, to mock, to insult" Genesis 21:9; and then to engage in dances accompanied with music, in honor of an idol. This was often practiced, as the worship of idols was celebrated with songs and dances. This is particularly affirmed of this instance of idol worship Exodus 32:19; and this was common among ancient idolaters; and this mode of worship was even adopted by David before the ark of the Lord; 2 Samuel 6:5; 1 Chronicles 13:8; 1 Chronicles 15:29. All that the word "to play" here necessarily implies is, that of choral songs and dances, accompanied with revelry in honor of the idol. It was, however, the fact that such worship was usually accompanied with much licentiousness; but that is not necessarily implied in the use of the word. Most of the oriental dances were grossly indecent and licentious, and the word here may be designed to include such indelicacy and licentiousness.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 10:7

    10:7 Neither be ye idolaters - And so, neither murmur ye, 1Co 10:10. The other cautions are given in the first person; but these in the second. And with what exquisite propriety does he vary the person! It would have been improper to say, Neither let us be idolaters; for he was himself in no danger of idolatry; nor probably of murmuring against Christ, or the divine providence. To play - That is, to dance, in honour of their idol. Exod 32:6.