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1 Corinthians 11:9

    1 Corinthians 11:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    for neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the man was not made for the woman, but the woman for the man.

    Webster's Revision

    for neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man:

    World English Bible

    for neither was man created for the woman, but woman for the man.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    for neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man:

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:9

    Neither was the man created, etc. - Και γαρ ουκ εκτισθη· for the man was not created upon the woman's account. The reason is plain from what is mentioned above; and from the original creation of woman she was made for the man, to be his proper or suitable helper.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 11:9

    Neither was the man created for the woman ... - This is a simple statement of what is expressed in Genesis. The woman was made for the comfort and happiness of the man. Not to be a slave, but a help-meet; not to be the minister of his pleasures, but to be his aid and comforter in life; not to be regarded as of inferior nature and rank, but to be his friend, to divide his sorrows, and to multiply and extend his joys; yet still to be in a station subordinate to him. He is to be the head: the ruler; the presider in the family circle; and she was created to aid him in his duties, to comfort him in his afflictions, to partake with him of his pleasures. Her rank is therefore honorable, though it is subordinate. It is, in some respects, the more honorable because it is subordinate and as her happiness is dependent on him, she has the higher claim to his protection and his tender care. The whole of Paul's idea here is, that her situation and rank as subordinate should be recognized by her at all times, and that in his presence it was proper that she should wear the usual symbol of modesty and subordination, the veil.