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1 Corinthians 14:29

    1 Corinthians 14:29 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the prophets speak two or three, and let the other judge.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the prophets speak two or three, and let the other judge.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And let the prophets speak by two or three, and let the others discern.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And let the prophets give their words, but not more than two or three, and let the others be judges of what they say.

    Webster's Revision

    And let the prophets speak by two or three, and let the others discern.

    World English Bible

    Let the prophets speak, two or three, and let the others discern.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And let the prophets speak by two or three, and let the others discern.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 14:29

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 14:29

    Let the prophets - Those who have the gift of speaking to men to edification, and exhortation, and comfort; 1 Corinthians 14:3.

    Two or three - As prophesying implied psalmody, teaching, and exhortation, Dr. Lightfoot thinks that the meaning of the place is this: Let one sing who has a psalm; let another teach who has a doctrine; and let a third exhort, or comfort, who has a gift of that kind.

    And let the other judge - The other prophets, or qualified persons, judge of the propriety of what had been spoken; or let them discern, διακρινετωσαν, how the revelation under the new covenant confirmed and illustrated the revelation granted under the Old Testament. It appears to have been taken for granted, that a man might pretend to this spirit of prophecy who was not sent of God; and therefore it was the duty of the accredited teachers to examine whether what he spoke was according to truth, and the analogy of faith. For the spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets; every man's gift was to be judged of by those whose age, experience, and wisdom, gave them a right to decide. Besides, though the person who did speak might do it from an impulse of God, yet, if he was not sufficiently known, his testimony ought to be received with caution; and therefore the aged prophets should judge of his gift, lest false doctrines should slide into the Church.

    But all these provisions, as Schoettgen justly observes, were in imitation of the practice in the Jewish synagogues; for there it was customary for them to object, interrogate, judge, refute, etc.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:29

    Let the prophets - See the note at 1 Corinthians 14:1.

    Speak two or three - On the same days, or at the same meeting; see the note at 1 Corinthians 14:27.

    And let the other judge - The word "other" (οἱ ἄλλοι hoi alloi, "the others"), Bloomfield supposes refers to the other prophets; and that the meaning is, that they should decide whether what was said was dictated by the Holy Spirit, or not. But the more probable sense, I think, is that which refers it to the rest of the congregation, and which supposes that they were to compare one doctrine with another, and deliberate on what was spoken, and determine whether it had evidence of being in accordance with the truth. It may be that the apostle here refers to those who had the gift of discerning spirits, and that he meant to say that they were to determine by what spirit the prophets who spoke were actuated. It was possible that those who claimed to be prophets might err, and it was the duty of all to examine whether that which was uttered was in accordance with truth. And if this was a duty then, it is a duty now; if it was proper even when the teachers claimed to be under divine inspiration, it is much more the duty of the people now. No minister of religion has a right to demand that all that he speaks shall be regarded as truth, unless he can give good reasons for it: no man is to be debarred from the right of canvassing freely, and comparing with the Bible, and with sound reason, all that the minister of the gospel advances. No minister who has just views of his office, and a proper acquaintance with the truth, and confidence in it, would desire to prohibit the people from the most full and free examination of all that he utters. It may be added, that the Scripture everywhere encourages the most full and free examination of all doctrines that are advanced; and that true religion advances just in proportion as this spirit of candid, and earnest, and prayerful examination prevails among a people; see the note at Acts 17:11; compare 1 Thessalonians 5:21.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 14:29

    14:29 Let two or three of the prophets - Not more, at one meeting. Speak - One after another, expounding the scripture.