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1 Corinthians 15:17

    1 Corinthians 15:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; you are yet in your sins.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and if Christ hath not been raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And if that is so, your faith is of no effect; you are still in your sins.

    Webster's Revision

    and if Christ hath not been raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.

    World English Bible

    If Christ has not been raised, your faith is vain; you are still in your sins.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and if Christ hath not been raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 15:17

    Vain - Empty; foolish; useless.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:17

    Ye are yet in your sins - If Christ has not risen from the dead, there is no proof that he has not been justly put to death. If he were a malefactor, God would not work a miracle to raise him from the dead. If he has not been raised from the dead, there is a presumption that he has been put to death justly; and, if so, consequently he has made no atonement; and ye are yet in your sins - under the power, guilt, and condemnation of them. All this reasoning of the apostle goes to prove that at Corinth, even among those false teachers, the innocency of our Lord was allowed, and the reality of his resurrection not questioned.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 15:17

    Your faith is vain, - 1 Corinthians 15:14. The meaning of this passage here is, that their faith was vain, "because," if Christ was not raised up, they were yet unpardoned sinners. The pardon of sin was connected with the belief of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and, if he was not raised, they were still in a state of sin.

    Ye are yet in your sins - Your sins are yet unpardoned. They can be forgiven only by faith in him, and by the efficacy of his blood. But if he was not raised, he was an impostor; and, of course, all your hopes of pardon by him, and through him, must be vain. The argument in this verse consists in an appeal to their Christian experience and their hopes. It may be thus expressed:

    (1) You have reason to believe that your sins are forgiven. You cherish that belief on evidence that is satisfactory to you. But if Christ is not raised, that cannot be true. He was an impostor, and sins cannot be forgiven by him. As you are not, and cannot be prepared to admit that your sins are not forgiven, you cannot admit a doctrine which involves that.

    (2) you have evidence that you are not under the dominion of sin. You have repented of it; have forsaken it; and are leading a holy life. You know that, and cannot be induced to doubt this fact. But all that is to be traced to the doctrine that the Lord Jesus rose from the dead. It is only by believing that, and the doctrines which are connected with it, that the power of sin in the heart has been destroyed. And as you "cannot" doubt that under the influence of "that truth" you have been enabled to break off from your sins, so you cannot admit a doctrine which would involve it as a consequence that you are yet under the condemnation and the dominion of sin. You must believe, therefore, that the Lord Jesus rose; and that, if he rose, others will also. This argument is good also now, just so far as there is evidence that, through the belief of a risen Saviour, the dominion of sin has been broken; and every Christian is, therefore, in an important sense, a witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, a living proof that a system which can work so great changes, and produce such evidence that sins are forgiven as are furnished in the conversion of sinners, must be from God; and, of course, that the work of the Lord Jesus was accepted, and that he was raised up from the dead.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 15:17

    15:17 Ye are still in your sins - That is, under the guilt of them. So that there needed something more than reformation, (which was plainly wrought,) in order to their being delivered from the guilt of sin even that atonement, the sufficiency of which God attested by raising our great Surety from the grave.