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1 Corinthians 4:1

    1 Corinthians 4:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let a man so account of us, as of ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let us be judged as servants of Christ, and as those who are responsible for the secret things of God.

    Webster's Revision

    Let a man so account of us, as of ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.

    World English Bible

    So let a man think of us as Christ's servants, and stewards of God's mysteries.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let a man so account of us, as of ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 4:1

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 4:1

    Let a man so account of us - This is a continuation of the subject in the preceding chapter; and should not have been divided from it.

    The fourth chapter would have begun better at 1 Corinthians 4:6, and the third should have ended with the fifth verse (1 Corinthians 4:5).

    As of the ministers of Christ - Ως ὑπηρετας Χριστου. The word ὑπηρετης means an under-rower, or one, who, in the trireme, quadrireme, or quinquereme galleys, rowed in one of the undermost benches; but it means also, as used by the Greek writers, any inferior officer or assistant. By the term here the apostle shows the Corinthians that, far from being heads and chiefs, he and his fellow apostles considered themselves only as inferior officers, employed under Christ from whom alone they received their appointment their work, and their recompense.

    Stewards of the mysteries of God - Και οικονομους μυστηριων Θεου, Economists of the Divine mysteries. See the explanation of the word steward in the note on Matthew 24:45, (note); Luke 8:3, (note); Luke 12:42, (note)

    The steward, or oikonomos, was the master's deputy in regulating the concerns of the family, providing food for the household, seeing it served out at the proper times and seasons, and in proper quantities. He received all the cash, expended what was necessary for the support of the family, and kept exact accounts, which he was obliged at certain times to lay before the master. The mysteries, the doctrines of God, relative to the salvation of the world by the passion and death of Christ; and the inspiration, illumination, and purification of the soul by the Spirit of Christ, constituted a principal part of the Divine treasure intrusted to the hands of the stewards by their heavenly Master; as the food that was to be dispensed at proper times, seasons, and in proper proportions to the children and domestics of the Church, which is the house of God.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 4:1

    Let a man - Let all; let this be the estimate formed of us by each one of you.

    So account of us - So think of us, the apostles.

    As the ministers of Christ - As the servants of Christ. Let them form a true estimate of us and our office - not as the head of a faction; not as designing to form parties, but as unitedly and entirely the servants of Christ; see 1 Corinthians 3:5.

    And stewards - Stewards were those who presided over the affairs of a family, and made provision for it, etc.; see the note at Luke 16:1. It was an office of much responsibility; and the apostle by using the term here seems to have designed to elevate those whom he seemed to have depreciated in 1 Corinthians 3:5.

    Of the mysteries of God - Of the gospel; see the note at 1 Corinthians 2:7. The office of steward was to provide those things which were necessary for the use of a family. And so the office of a minister of the gospel, and a steward of its mysteries, is to dispense such instructions, guidance, counsel, etc., as may be requisite to build up the church of Christ; to make known those sublime truths which are contained in the gospel, but which had not been made known before the revelation of Jesus Christ, and which are, therefore, called "mysteries." It is implied in this verse:

    (1) That the office of a minister is one that is subordinate to Christ - they are his servants.

    (2) that those in the office should not attempt to be the head of sect or party in the church.

    (3) that the office is honorable as that of a steward is; and,

    (4) That Christians should endeavor to form and cherish just ideas of ministers; to give them their TRUE honor; but not to overrate their importance.