Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

1 Corinthians 7:10

    1 Corinthians 7:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And to the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But unto the married I give charge, yea not I, but the Lord, That the wife depart not from her husband

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But to the married I give orders, though not I but the Lord, that the wife may not go away from her husband

    Webster's Revision

    But unto the married I give charge, yea not I, but the Lord, That the wife depart not from her husband

    World English Bible

    But to the married I command--not I, but the Lord--that the wife not leave her husband

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But unto the married I give charge, yea not I, but the Lord, That the wife depart not from her husband

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 7:10

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 7:10

    I command, yet not I, but the Lord - I do not give my own private opinion or judgment in this case; for the Lord Jesus commands that man shall not put asunder them whom God hath joined, Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:6. And God has said the same, Genesis 2:24. The following extracts will prove that the law among the Jews was very loose relative to the firmness of the marriage bond: -

    A woman might put away or depart from her husband by giving this simple reason to the elders, who would give the following certificate.

    "In ____ day of ____ week, of ____ year, A., daughter of B., put away before us and said: My mother, or my brethren, deceived me, and wedded me or betrothed me, when I was a very young maid, to C., son of D.; but I now reveal my mind before you, that I will not have him."

    Sometimes they parted with mutual consent, and this also was considered legal, as was also the marriage of the separated parties to others. Witness the following story: "A good man had a good wife; but because they had no children, they mutually put away each other. The good man married a bad (a heathen) wife, and she made him bad (a heathen); the good woman married a bad (a heathen) husband, and she made him good." Divorces were easily obtained among them, and they considered them the dissolving of the marriage bond; and, in consequence of these, the parties might remarry with others. This was contrary to the original institution of marriage, and is opposed both by our Lord and the apostle.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 7:10

    And unto the married - This verse commences the second subject of inquiry; to wit, whether it was proper, in the existing state of things, for those who were married to continue this relation, or whether they ought to separate. The reasons why any may have supposed that it was best to separate, may have been:

    (1) That their troubles and persecutions might be such that they might judge it best that families should be broken up; and,

    (2) Probably many supposed that it was unlawful for a Christian wife or husband to be connected at all with a pagan and an idolater.

    I command, yet not I, but the Lord - Not I so much as the Lord. This injunction is not to be understood as adVice merely, but as a solemn, divine command, from which you are not at liberty to depart. Paul here professes to utter the language of inspiration, and demands obedience. The express command of "the Lord" to which he refers, is probably the precept recorded in Matthew 5:32, and Matthew 19:3-10. These precepts of Christ asserted that the marriage tie was sacred and inviolable.

    Let not the wife depart ... - Let her not prove faithless to her marriage vows; let her not, on any pretence, desert her husband. Though she is a Christian. and he is not, yet let her not seek, on that account, to be separate from him - The law of Moses did not permit a wife to divorce herself from her husband, though it was sometimes done (compare Matthew 10:12); but the Greek and Roman laws allowed it - Grotius. But Paul here refers to a formal and legal separation before the magistrates, and not to a voluntary separation, without intending to be formally divorced. The reasons for this opinion are:

    (1) That such divorces were known and practiced among both Jews and pagans.

    (2) it was important to settle the question whether they were to be allowed in the Christian church.

    (3) the claim would be set up, probably, that it might be done.

    (4) the question whether a "voluntary separation" might not be proper, where one party was a Christian, and the other not, he discusses in the following verses, 1 Corinthians 7:12-17. Here, therefore, he solemnly repeats the law of Christ, that divorce, under the Christian economy, was not to be in the power either of the husband or wife.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 7:10

    7:10 Not I - Only. But the Lord - Christ; by his express command, Matt 5:32.