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1 Corinthians 7:26

    1 Corinthians 7:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I suppose therefore that this is good for the present distress, I say, that it is good for a man so to be.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I suppose therefore that this is good for the present distress, I say, that it is good for a man so to be.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I think therefore that this is good by reason of the distress that is upon us, namely, that it is good for a man to be as he is.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In my opinion then, because of the present trouble, it is good for a man to keep as he is.

    Webster's Revision

    I think therefore that this is good by reason of the distress that is upon us, namely, that it is good for a man to be as he is.

    World English Bible

    I think that it is good therefore, because of the distress that is on us, that it is good for a man to be as he is.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I think therefore that this is good by reason of the present distress, namely, that it is good for a man to be as he is.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 7:26

    This is good for the present distress - There was no period in the heathen times when the Church was not under persecutions and afflictions; on some occasions these were more oppressive than at others.

    The word αναγκη signifies, necessity, distress, tribulation, and calamity; as it does in Luke 21:23; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 12:10. In such times, when the people of God had no certain dwelling-place, when they were lying at the mercy of their enemies without any protection from the state - the state itself often among the persecutors - he who had a family to care for, would find himself in very embarrassed circumstances, as it would be much more easy to provide for his personal safety than to have the care of a wife and children. On this account it was much better for unmarried persons to continue for the present in their celibacy.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 7:26

    I suppose - I think; I give the following advice.

    For the present distress - In the present state of trial. The word "distress" (ἀνάγκην anagkēn, necessity) denotes calamity, persecution, trial, etc.; see Luke 21:23. The word rendered "present" (ἐνεστῶσαν enestōsan) denotes that which "urges on," or that which at that time presses on, or afflicts. Here it is implied:

    (1) That at that time they were subject to trials so severe as to render the advice which he was about to give proper; and,

    (2) That he by no means meant that this should be a "permanent arrangement" in the church, and of course it cannot be urged as an argument for the monastic system.

    What the "urgent distress" of this time was, is not certainly known. If the Epistle was written about 59 a.d. (see the introduction), it was in the time of Nero; and probably he had already begun to oppress and persecute Christians. At all events, it is evident that the Christians at Corinth were subject to some trials which rendered the cares of the marriage life undesirable.

    It is good for a man so to be - The emphasis here is on the word "so" οὕτως houtōs; that is, it is best for a man to conduct "in the following manner;" the word so referring to the advice which follows. "I advise that he conduct in the following manner, to wit." Most commentators suppose that it means "as he is:" that is, unmarried; but the interpretation proposed above best suits the connection. The advice given is in the following verses.