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1 Corinthians 7:3

    1 Corinthians 7:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the husband render to the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife to the husband.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let the husband render unto the wife her due: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let the husband give to the wife what is right; and let the wife do the same to the husband.

    Webster's Revision

    Let the husband render unto the wife her due: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.

    World English Bible

    Let the husband render to his wife the affection owed her, and likewise also the wife to her husband.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let the husband render unto the wife her due: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 7:3

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 7:3

    Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence - Την οφειλομενην ευνοιαν· Though our version is no translation of the original, yet few persons are at a loss for the meaning, and the context is sufficiently plain. Some have rendered the words, not unaptly, the matrimonial debt, or conjugal duty - that which a wife owes to her husband, and the husband to his wife; and which they must take care mutually to render, else alienation of affection will be the infallible consequence, and this in numberless instances has led to adulterous connections. In such cases the wife has to blame herself for the infidelity of her husband, and the husband for that of his wife. What miserable work has been made in the peace of families by a wife or a husband pretending to be wiser than the apostle, and too holy and spiritual to keep the commandments of God!

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 7:3

    Let the husband ... - "Let them not imagine that there is any virtue in bring separate from each other, as if they were in a state of celibacy" - "Doddridge." They are bound to each other; in every way they are to evince kindness, and to seek to promote the happiness and purity of each other. There is a great deal of delicacy used here by Paul, and his expression is removed as far as possible from the grossness of pagan writers. His meaning is plain; but instead of using a word to express it which would be indelicate and offensive, he uses one which is not indelicate in the slightest degree. The word which he uses εὔνοιαν eunoian," benevolence") denotes kindness, good-will, affection of mind. And by the use of the word "due" ὀφειλομένην opheilomenēn, he reminds them of the sacredness of their vow, and of the fact that in person, property, and in every respect, they belong to each other. It was necessary to give this direction, for the contrary might have been regarded as proper by many who would have supposed there was special virtue and merit in living separate from each other; as facts have shown that many have imbibed such an idea - and it was not possible to give the rule with more delicacy than Paul has done. Many mss., however, instead of "due benevolence," read ὀφειλὴν opheilēn, "a debt, or that which is owed;" and this reading has been adopted by Griesbach in the text. Homer, with a delicacy not unlike the apostle Paul, uses the word φιλότητα filotēta, "friendship," to express the same idea.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 7:3

    7:3 Let not married persons fancy that there is any perfection in living with each other, as if they were unmarried. The debt - This ancient reading seems far more natural than the common one.