Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

1 Corinthians 9:25

    1 Corinthians 9:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And every man that strives for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And every man that striveth in the games exerciseth self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And every man who takes part in the sports has self-control in all things. Now they do it to get a crown which is of this world, but we for an eternal crown.

    Webster's Revision

    And every man that striveth in the games exerciseth self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.

    World English Bible

    Every man who strives in the games exercises self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown, but we an incorruptible.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And every man that striveth in the games is temperate in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.

    Definitions for 1 Corinthians 9:25

    Temperate - To exercise power or self-control.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Corinthians 9:25

    Is temperate in all things - All those who contended in these exercises went through a long state and series of painful preparations. To this exact discipline Epictetus refers, cap. 35: Θελεις Ολυμπια νικησαι; Δει σ' ευτακτειν, αναγκοτροφειν, απεχεσθαι, πεμματων, γυμναζεσθαι προς αναγκην εν ὡρα τεταγμενη, εν καυματι, εν ψυχει, μη ψυχρον πινειν, μη οινον ὡς ετυχεν· ἁπλως, ὡς ιατρῳ, παραδεδωκεναι σεαυτον τῳ επιστατη· ειτα εις τον αγωνα παρερχεσθαι· κ. τ. λ. "Do you wish to gain the prize at the Olympic games? - Consider the requisite preparations and the consequences: you must observe a strict regimen; must live on food which you dislike; you must abstain from all delicacies; must exercise yourself at the necessary and prescribed times both in heat and in cold; you must drink nothing cooling; take no wine as formerly; in a word, you must put yourself under the directions of a pugilist, as you would under those of a physician, and afterwards enter the lists. Here you may get your arm broken, your foot put out of joint, be obliged to swallow mouthfuls of dust, to receive many stripes, and after all be conquered." Thus we find that these suffered much hardships in order to conquer, and yet were uncertain of the victory.

    Horace speaks of it in nearly the same way: -

    Qui studet optatam cursu contingere metam,

    Multa tulit fecitque puer: sudavit et alsit:

    Abstinuit Venere et Baccho.

    De Arte Poet., ver. 412.

    A youth who hopes the Olympic prize to gain,

    All arts must try, and every toil sustain;

    Th' extremes of heat and cold must often prove;

    And shun the weakening joys of wine and love.

    Francis.

    These quotations show the propriety of the apostle's words: Every man that striveth for the mastery, παντα εγκρατευεται, is temperate, or continent, in all things.

    They do it to obtain a corruptible crown - The crown won by the victor in the Olympian games was made of the wild olive; in the Pythian games of laurel; in the Nemean games of parsley; and in the Isthmian games of the pine. These were all corruptible, for they began to wither as soon as they were separated from the trees, or plucked out of the earth. In opposition to these, the apostle says, he contended for an incorruptible crown, the heavenly inheritance. He sought not worldly honor; but that honor which comes from God.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Corinthians 9:25

    And every man that striveth for the mastery - (ὁ ἀγωνιζόμενος ho agōnizomenos). That "agonizes;" that is, that is engaged in the exercise of "wrestling, boxing," or pitching the bar or quoit; compare the note at Luke 13:24. The sense is, everyone who endeavors to obtain a victory in these athletic exercises.

    Is temperate in all things - The word which is rendered "is temperate" (ἐγκρατευεται egkrateuetai) denotes "abstinence" from all that would excite, stimulate, and ultimately enfeeble; from wine, from exciting and luxurious living, and from licentious indulgences. It means that they did all they could to make the body vigorous, active, and supple. They pursued a course of entire temperate living; compare Acts 24:25; 1 Corinthians 7:9; Galatians 5:23; 2 Peter 1:6. It relates not only to indulgences unlawful in themselves, but to abstinence from many things that were regarded as "lawful," but which were believed to render the body weak and effeminate. The phrase "in all things" means that this course of temperance or abstinence was not confined to one thing, or to one class of things, but to every kind of food and drink, and every indulgence that had a tendency to render the body weak and effeminate. The preparations which those who propose to contend in these games made is well known; and is often referred to by the Classic writers. Epictetus, as quoted by Grotius (in loco), thus speaks of these preparations. "Do you wish to gain the prize at the Olympic games? consider the requisite preparations and the consequence You must observe a strict regimen; must live on food which is unpleasant; must abstain from all delicacies; must exercise yourself at the prescribed times in heat and in cold; you must drink nothing cool (ψυχρὸν psuchron); must take no wine as usual; you must put yourself under a "pugilist," as you would under a physician, and afterward enter the lists." Epict. chapter 35: Horace has described the preparations necessary in the same way.

    Qui studet optatam cursn contingere metam.

    Multa tulit fecitque puer; sudavit, et alsit,

    Abstinuit venere et Baccho.

    De Arte Poet. 412

    A youth who hopes the Olympic prize to gain,

    All arts must try, and every toil sustain;

    The extremes of heat and cold must often prove,

    And shun the weakening joys of wine and love.

    Francis.

    To obtain a corruptible crown - A garland, diadem, or civic wreath, that must soon fade away. The garland bestowed on the victor was made of olive, pine, apple, laurel, or parsley. That would soon lose its beauty and fade; of course, it could be of little value. Yet we see how eagerly they sought it; how much self-denial those who entered the lists would practice to obtain it; how long they would deny themselves of the common pleasures of life that they might be successful. So much "temperance" would pagans practice to obtain a fading wreath of laurel, pine, or parsley. Hence, learn:

    (1) The duty of denying ourselves to obtain a far more valuable reward, the incorruptible crown of heaven.

    (2) the duty of all Christians who strive for that crown to be temperate in all things. If the pagans practiced temperance to obtain a fading laurel, should not we to obtain one that never fades?

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Corinthians 9:25

    9:25 And every one that there contendeth is temperate in all things - To an almost incredible degree; using the most rigorous self denial in food, sleep, and every other sensual indulgence. A corruptible crown - A garland of leaves, which must soon wither. The moderns only have discovered that it is legal to do all this and more for an eternal crown than they did for a corruptible!