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1 Kings 11:3

    1 Kings 11:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines: and his wives turned away his heart.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines: and his wives turned away his heart.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines; and his wives turned away his heart.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He had seven hundred wives, daughters of kings, and three hundred other wives; and through his wives his heart was turned away.

    Webster's Revision

    And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines; and his wives turned away his heart.

    World English Bible

    He had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines; and his wives turned away his heart.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he had seven hundred wives, princesses, and three hundred concubines: and his wives turned away his heart.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 11:3

    He had seven hundred wives, princesses - How he could get so many of the blood royal from the different surrounding nations, is astonishing; but probably the daughters of noblemen, generals, etc., may be included.

    And three hundred concubines - These were wives of the second rank, who were taken according to the usages of those times; but their offspring could not inherit. Sarah was to Abraham what these seven hundred princesses were to Solomon; and the three hundred concubines stood in the same relation to the Israelitish king as Hagar and Keturah did to the patriarch.

    Here then are one thousand wives to form this great bad man's harem! Was it possible that such a person could have any piety to God, who was absorbed by such a number of women? We scarcely allow a man to have the fear of God who has a second wife or mistress; in what state then must the man be who has one thousand of them? We may endeavor to excuse all this by saying, "It was a custom in the East to have a multitude of women, and that there were many of those whom Solomon probably never saw," etc., etc. But was there any of them whom he might not have seen? Was it for reasons of state, or merely court splendor, that he had so many? How then is it said that he loved many strange women? - that he clave to them in love? And did he not give them the utmost proofs of his attachment when he not only tolerated their iniquitous worship in the land, but built temples to their idols, and more, burnt incense to them himself? As we should not condemn what God justifies, so we should not justify what God condemns. He went after Ashtaroth, the impure Venus of the Sidonians; after Milcom, the abomination of the Ammonites; after Chemosh, the abomination of the Moabites; and after the murderous Molech, the abomination of the children of Ammon. He seems to have gone as far in iniquity as it was possible.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Kings 11:3

    These numbers seem excessive to many critics, and it must be admitted that history furnishes no parallel to them. In Sol 6:8 the number of Solomon's legitimate wives is said to be sixty, and that of his concubines eighty. It is, perhaps probable, that the text has in this place suffered corruption. For "700" we should perhaps read "70."

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Kings 11:3

    11:3 Seven hundred wives, and c. - God had particularly forbidden the kings to multiply either horses or wives, Deut 17:16,17, we saw chap.1Ki 10:29, how he broke the former law, multiplying horses: and here we see, how he broke the latter, multiplying wives. David set the example. One ill act of a good man may do more mischief than twenty of a wicked man. Besides, they were strange women, of the nations which God had expressly forbidden them to marry with. And to compleat the mischief, he clave unto these in love; was extravagantly fond of them, Solomon had much knowledge. But to what purpose, when he knew not how to govern his appetites?