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1 Kings 19:3

    1 Kings 19:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beersheba, which belongeth to Judah, and left his servant there.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beer-sheba, which belongeth to Judah, and left his servant there.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he got up, fearing for his life, and went in flight, and came to Beer-sheba in Judah, parting there from his servant;

    Webster's Revision

    And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beer-sheba, which belongeth to Judah, and left his servant there.

    World English Bible

    When he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beer-sheba, which belongeth to Judah, and left his servant there.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 19:3

    He arose, and went for his life - He saw it was best to give place to this storm, and go to a place of safety. He probably thought that the miracle at Carmel would have been the means of effecting the conversion of the whole court and of the country, but, finding himself mistaken, he is greatly discouraged.

    To Beer-sheba - This being at the most southern extremity of the promised land, and under the jurisdiction of the king of Judah, he might suppose himself in a place of safety.

    Left his servant there - Being alone, he would be the more unlikely to be discovered; besides, he did not wish to risk the life of his servant.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Kings 19:3

    The rapid movement of the original is very striking. "And he saw (or, "feared," as some read), and he rose, and he went, etc." The fear and flight of Elijah are very remarkable. Jezebel's threat alone, had not, in all probability, produced the extraordinary change but, partly, physical reaction from the over-excitement of the preceding day; and, partly, internal disquietude and doubt as to the wisdom of the course which he had adopted.

    Beer-sheba is about 95 miles from Jezreel, on the very borders of the desert et-Tih. Elijah cannot possibly have reached it until the close of the second day. It seems implied that he traveled both night and day, and did not rest until he arrived thus far on his way. It was one of the towns assigned to the tribe of Simeon Joshua 19:2. The Simeonites were, however, by this time absorbed into Judah.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Kings 19:3

    19:3 Left his servant - Because he would not expose him to those perils and hardships which he expected: and because he desired solitude, that he might more freely converse with God.