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1 Kings 2:10

    1 Kings 2:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    So David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    So David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then David went to rest with his fathers, and his body was put into the earth in the town of David.

    Webster's Revision

    And David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    World English Bible

    David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 2:10

    David slept with his fathers - His life was a life of remarkable providences, of much piety, and of great public usefulness. In general he lived well, and it is most evident that he died well; and as a king, a general, a poet, a father, and a friend, he has had few equals, and no superior, from his own time to the present day. But I shall reserve a more particular consideration of his character till I come to the book of Psalms, in which that character, with all its lights and shades, is exhibited by his own masterly hand. And it is from this composition alone that we can know David, and the maxims by which he was governed in public and private life.

    Was buried in the city of David - And Solomon, says Josephus, deposited immense treasures with him, in the grave, where they continued unmolested for thirteen hundred years, till Hyrcanus, the high priest, being besieged by Antiochus, opened the sepulcher, and took thence three thousand talents, part of which he gave to Antiochus, to raise the siege. It is added that, many years afterwards, Herod the Great ransacked this tomb and got considerable riches. Little credit is due to this account, though we know that was customary in ancient times to deposit with the more illustrious dead, gold, silver, and precious stones. That the tomb of David existed in the days of the apostles, we learn from Acts 2:29, where St. Peter, addressing the Jews, says, Men and brethren, let me speak freely to you of the patriarch David; that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulcher is with us unto this day. St. Jerome speaks of it as existing in his time, and modern travelers pretend that it is still in existence. But both monks and Mohammedans have long united to impose on Christian pilgrims; and there is scarcely any dependence to be placed on any of their relations; absurdity and self-contradiction are their principal characteristics.