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1 Kings 2:30

    1 Kings 2:30 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Benaiah came to the tabernacle of the LORD, and said unto him, Thus saith the king, Come forth. And he said, Nay; but I will die here. And Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Benaiah came to the tabernacle of the LORD, and said to him, Thus said the king, Come forth. And he said, No; but I will die here. And Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Benaiah came to the Tent of Jehovah, and said unto him, Thus saith the king, Come forth. And he said, Nay; but I will die here. And Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Benaiah came to the Tent of the Lord and said to him, The king says, Come out. And he said, No; but let death come to me here. And Benaiah went back to the king and gave him word of the answer which Joab had given.

    Webster's Revision

    And Benaiah came to the Tent of Jehovah, and said unto him, Thus saith the king, Come forth. And he said, Nay; but I will die here. And Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me.

    World English Bible

    Benaiah came to the Tent of Yahweh, and said to him, "Thus says the king, 'Come forth!'" He said, "No; but I will die here." Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, "Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Benaiah came to the Tent of the LORD, and said unto him, Thus saith the king, Come forth. And he said, Nay; but I will die here. And Benaiah brought the king word again, saying, Thus said Joab, and thus he answered me.

    Definitions for 1 Kings 2:30

    Nay - No.
    Tabernacle - A tent, booth or dwelling.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 2:30

    Nay; but I will die here - The altars were so sacred among all the people, that, in general, even the vilest wretch found safety, if he once reached the altar. This led to many abuses, and the perversion of public justice; and at last it became a maxim that the guilty should be punished, should they even have taken refuge at the altars. God decreed that the presumptuous murderer who had taken refuge at the altar should be dragged thence, and put to death; see Exodus 21:14. The heathens had the same kind of ordinance; hence Euripides: -

    Εγω γαρ ὁστις μη δικαιος ων ανηρ

    Βωμον προσιζει, τον νομον χαιρειν εων,

    Προς την δικην αγοιμ' αν, αυ τρεσας θεους·

    Κακον γαρ ανδρα χρη κακως πασχειν αει.

    Euripid. Frag. 42. Edit. Musg.

    "If an unrighteous man, availing himself of the law, should claim the protection of the altar, I would drag him to justice, nor fear the wrath of the gods; for it is necessary that every wicked man should suffer for his crimes."

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Kings 2:30

    2:30 He said, Nay, and c. - For he supposed, either, that Solomon would not defile that place with his blood, but would spare him for his respect to it, as he had done Adonijah: or, he had a superstitious conceit, that his dying there might give his guilty and miserable soul some advantage.