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1 Kings 4:28

    1 Kings 4:28 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Barley also and straw for the horses and dromedaries brought they unto the place where the officers were, every man according to his charge.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Barley also and straw for the horses and dromedaries brought they to the place where the officers were, every man according to his charge.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Barley also and straw for the horses and swift steeds brought they unto the place where the officers were, every man according to his charge.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And they took grain and dry grass for the horses and the carriage-horses, to the right place, every man as he was ordered.

    Webster's Revision

    Barley also and straw for the horses and swift steeds brought they unto the place where the officers were, every man according to his charge.

    World English Bible

    Barley also and straw for the horses and swift steeds brought they to the place where [the officers] were, every man according to his duty.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Barley also and straw for the horses and swift steeds brought they unto the place where the officers were, every man according to his charge.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 4:28

    And dromedaries - The word רכש rechesh, which we translate thus, is rendered beasts, or beasts of burden, by the Vulgate; mares by the Syriac and Arabic; chariots by the Septuagint; and race-horses by the Chaldee. The original word seems to signify a very swift kind of horse, and race-horse or post-horse is probably its true meaning. To communicate with so many distant provinces, Solomon had need of many animals of this kind.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Kings 4:28

    Barley is to this day in the East the common food of horses.

    Dromedaries - Coursers. The animal intended is neither a camel nor a mule, but a swift horse.

    The place where the officers were - Rather, "places where the horses and coursers were," i. e., to the different cities where they were lodged.