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1 Kings 9:18

    1 Kings 9:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Baalath, and Tadmor in the wilderness, in the land,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Baalath, and Tadmor in the wilderness, in the land,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and Baalath, and Tamar in the wilderness, in the land,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Baalath and Tamar in the waste land, in that land;

    Webster's Revision

    and Baalath, and Tamar in the wilderness, in the land,

    World English Bible

    and Baalath, and Tamar in the wilderness, in the land,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and Baalath, and Tamar in the wilderness, in the land,

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Kings 9:18

    And Tadmor in the wilderness - This is almost universally allowed to be the same with the celebrated Palmyra, the ruins of which remain to the present day, and give us the highest idea of Solomon's splendor and magnificence. Palmyra stood upon a fertile plain surrounded by a barren desert, having the river Euphrates on the east. The ruins are well described by Messrs. Dawkes and Wood, of which they give fine representations. They are also well described in the ancient part of the Universal History, vol. i., p. 367-70. The description concludes thus: "The world never saw a more glorious city; the pride, it is likely, of ancient times, and the reproach of our own; a city not more remarkable for the state of her buildings and unwontedness of her situation than for the extraordinary personages who once flourished there, among whom the renowned Zenobia and the incomparable Longinus must for ever be remembered with admiration and regret."

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Kings 9:18

    Tadmor - The Hebrew text here has, as written, Tamor (or Tamar), and as read, Tadmor. That the latter place, or Palmyra, was meant appears, first, from the distinct statement of Chronicles 2 Chronicles 8:4 that Solomon built Tadmor, and the improbability that the fact would be omitted in Kings; secondly, from the strong likelihood that Solomon, with his wide views of commerce, would seize and fortify the Palmy-rene Oasis: and thirdly, from the unanimity of the old versions in rendering Tamar here by Tadmor. The probability seems to be that Tamar was the original name of the place, being the Hebrew word for "a palm," from where it is generally agreed that the town derived its name. Tadmor was a corrupt or dialectic variety of the word, which was adopted at the city itself, and prevailed over the original appellation. No reference is found to Tadmor in the Assyrian inscriptions, or in any Classical writer before Pliny.