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1 Peter 1:20

    1 Peter 1:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who truly was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    who was foreknown indeed before the foundation of the world, but was manifested at the end of times for your sake,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who was marked out by God before the making of the world, but was caused to be seen in these last times for you,

    Webster's Revision

    who was foreknown indeed before the foundation of the world, but was manifested at the end of times for your sake,

    World English Bible

    who was foreknown indeed before the foundation of the world, but was revealed at the end of times for your sake,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    who was foreknown indeed before the foundation of the world, but was manifested at the end of the times for your sake,

    Definitions for 1 Peter 1:20

    Manifest - To make openly known; appear.
    Verily - Truly; surely.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 1:20

    Who verily was foreordained - Προεγνωσμενου· Foreknown; appointed in the Divine purpose to be sent into the world, because infinitely approved by the Divine justice.

    Before the foundation of the world - Before the law was given, or any sacrifice prescribed by it. Its whole sacrificial system was appointed in reference to this foreappointed Lamb, and consequently from him derived all its significance and virtue. The phrase καταβολη κοσμου, foundation of the world, occurs often in the New Testament, and is supposed by some learned men and good critics to signify the commencement of the Jewish state. Perhaps it may have this meaning in Matthew 13:35; Luke 11:50; Ephesians 1:4; Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26. But if we take it here in its common signification, the creation of universal nature, then it shows that God, foreseeing the fall and ruin of man, appointed the remedy that was to cure the disease. It may here have a reference to the opinion of the Jewish doctors, who maintain that seven things existed before the creation of the world, one of which was the Messiah.

    Last times - The Gospel dispensation, called the last times, as we have often seen, because never to be succeeded by any other.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 1:20

    Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world - That is, it was foreordained, or predetermined, that he should be the great stoning Sacrifice for sin. On the meaning of the word "foreordained," (προγινώσκω proginōskō,) see Romans 8:29. The word is rendered which knew, Acts 26:5; foreknew and foreknow, Romans 8:29; Romans 11:2; foreordained, 1 Peter 1:20; and know before, 2 Peter 2:17. It does not elsewhere occur in the New Testament. The sense is, that the plan was formed, and the arrangements made for the atonement, before the world was created.

    Before the foundation of the world - That is, from eternity. It was before man was formed; before the earth was made; before any of the material universe was brought into being; before the angels were created. Compare the Matthew 25:34 note; John 17:24 note; Ephesians 1:4 note.

    But was manifest - Was revealed. See the notes at 1 Timothy 3:16.

    In these last times - In this, the last dispensation of things on the earth. See the notes at Hebrews 1:2.

    For you - For your benefit or advantage. See the notes at 1 Peter 1:12. It follows from what is said in this verse:

    (1) that the atonement was not an afterthought on the part of God. It entered into his plan when he made the world, and was revolved in his purposes from eternity.

    (2) it was not a device to supply a defect in the system; that is, it was not adopted because the system did not work well, or because God had been disappointed. It was arranged before man was created, and when none but God could know whether he would stand or fall.

    (3) the creation of the earth must have had some reference to this plan of redemption, and that plan must have been regarded as in itself so glorious, and so desirable, that it was deemed best to bring the world into existence that the plan might be developed, though it would involve the certainty that the race would fall, and that many would perish. It was, on the whole, more wise and benevolent that the race should be created with a certainty that they would apostatize, than it would be that the race should not he created, and the plan of salvation be unknown to distant worlds. See the notes at 1 Peter 1:12.