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1 Peter 2:1

    1 Peter 2:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore laying aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why laying aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, all evil speakings,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Putting away therefore all wickedness, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So putting away all wrongdoing, and all tricks and deceits and envies and evil talk,

    Webster's Revision

    Putting away therefore all wickedness, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings,

    World English Bible

    Putting away therefore all wickedness, all deceit, hypocrisies, envies, and all evil speaking,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Putting away therefore all wickedness, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings,

    Definitions for 1 Peter 2:1

    Guile - Deceit; craftiness.
    Malice - Ill-will; badness.
    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 2:1

    Wherefore, laying aside - This is in close connection with the preceding chapter, from which it should not have been separated, and the subject is continued to the end of the 10th verse.

    Laying aside all malice - See the notes on Ephesians 4:22-31 (note). These tempers and dispositions must have been common among the Jews, as they are frequently spoken against: Christianity can never admit of such; they show the mind, not of Christ, but of the old murderer.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 2:1

    Wherefore laying aside - On the word rendered laying aside, see Romans 13:12; Ephesians 4:22, Ephesians 4:25; Colossians 3:8. The allusion is to putting off clothes; and the meaning is, that we are to cast off these things entirely; that is, we are no longer to practice them. The word "wherefore" (οὖν oun) refers to the reasonings in the first chapter. In view of the considerations stated there, we should renounce all evil.

    All malice - All "evil," (κακίαν kakian.) The word "malice" we commonly apply now to a particular kind of evil, denoting extreme enmity of heart, ill-will, a disposition to injure others without cause, from mere personal gratification, or from a spirit of revenge - Webster. The Greek word, however, includes evil of all kinds. See the notes at Romans 1:29. Compare Acts 8:22, where it is rendered wickedness, and 1 Corinthians 5:8; 1 Corinthians 14:20; Ephesians 4:31; Colossians 3:8; Titus 3:3.

    And all guile - Deceit of all kinds. See the Romans 1:29 note; 2 Corinthians 12:16 note; 1 Thessalonians 2:3 note.

    And hypocrisies - See the 1 Timothy 4:2, note; Matthew 23:28; Galatians 2:13, on the word rendered dissimulation. The word means, feigning to be what we are not; assuming a false appearance of religion; cloaking a wicked purpose under the appearance of piety.

    And envies - Hatred of others on account of some excellency which they have, or something which they possess which we do not. See the notes at Romans 1:29.

    And all evil speaking - Greek: "speaking against others." This word (καταλαλιὰ katalalia) occurs only here and in 2 Corinthians 12:20, where it is rendered "backbitings." It would include all unkind or slanderous speaking against others. This is by no means an uncommon fault in the world, and it is one of the designs of religion to guard against it. Religion teaches us to lay aside whatever guile, insincerity, and false appearances we may have acquired, and to put on the simple honesty and openness of children. We all acquire more or less of guile and insincerity in the course of life. We learn to conceal our sentiments and feelings, and almost unconsciously come to appear different from what we really are. It is not so with children. In the child, every emotion of the bosom appears as it is. "Nature there works well and beautifully." Every emotion is expressed; every feeling of the heart is developed; and in the cheeks, the open eye, the joyous or sad countenance, we know all that there is in the bosom, as certainly as we know all that there is in the rose by its color and its fragrance. Now, it is one of the purposes of religion to bring us back to this state, and to strip off all the subterfuges which we may have acquired in life; and he in whom this effect is not accomplished has never been converted. A man that is characteristically deceitful, cunning, and crafty, cannot be a Christian. "Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven," Matthew 18:3.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Peter 2:1

    2:1 Wherefore laying aside - As inconsistent with that pure love. All dissimulation - Which is the outward expression of guile in the heart.