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1 Peter 2:13

    1 Peter 2:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Be subject to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether to the king, as supreme;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Keep all the laws of men because of the Lord; those of the king, who is over all,

    Webster's Revision

    Be subject to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether to the king, as supreme;

    World English Bible

    Therefore subject yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether to the king, as supreme;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Be subject to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme;

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 2:13

    Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man - In every settled state, and under every form of political government, where the laws are not in opposition to the laws of God, it may be very soundly and rationally said: "Genuine Christians have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them." Society and civil security are in a most dangerous state when the people take it into their heads that they have a right to remodel and change the laws. See the whole of this subject fully handled in the notes on Romans 13:1, etc., to which I beg every reader, who may wish to know the political sentiments of this work, to have recourse.

    The words παση ανθρωπινη κτισει literally signify, not every ordinance of man, but every human creature; yet κτιζειν signifies sometimes to arrange, order, as well as to create, and therefore our translation may do: but as the apostle is evidently speaking here of magistracy, or legislative authority, and as the appointment of magistrates was termed a creating of them, it is better to understand the words thus, All the constituted authorities. So, Decem tribunos plebis per pontificem creaverunt; Cor. Nep. "They created ten tribunes of the plebeians, by the high priest." Carthagine quotannis annui bini reges creabantur; Caesar. "They created two kings every year at Carthage." Consules creantur Caesar et Servilius; Sallust. "Caesar and Servilius are created consuls." Creare ducem gerendo bello. "To create a general to conduct the war." The meaning of St. Peter appears to be this: the Jews thought it unlawful to obey any ruler that was not of their own stock; the apostle tells them they should obey the civil magistrate, let him be of what stock he may, whether a Jew or a Gentile, and let him exercise the government in whatsoever form. This is the general proposition: and then he instances emperors and their deputies; and, far from its being unlawful for them to obey a heathen magistrate, they were to do it for the Lord's sake, δια τον Κυριον, on account of the Lord, whose will it was, and who commanded it.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 2:13

    Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man - Greek, "to every creation of man," (ἀνθρωπίνῃ κτίσει anthrōpinē ktisei The meaning is, to every institution or appointment of man; to wit, of those who are in authority, or who are appointed to administer government. The laws, institutes, and appointments of such a government may be spoken of as the creation of man; that is, as what man makes. Of course, what is here said must be understood with the limitation everywhere implied, that what is ordained by those in authority is not contrary to the law of God. See the notes at Acts 4:19. On the general duty here enjoined of subjection to civil authority, see the notes at Romans 13:1-7.

    For the Lord's sake - Because he has required it, and has entrusted this power to civil rulers. See the notes at Romans 13:5. Compare the notes at Ephesians 6:7.

    Whether it be to the king - It has been commonly supposed that there is reference here to the Roman emperor, who might be called king, because in him the supreme power resided. The common title of the Roman sovereign was, as used by the Greek writers, ᾀυτοκράτωρ autokratōr, and among the Romans themselves, "imperator," (emperor;) but the title king was also given to the sovereign. John 19:15, "we have no king but Cesar." Acts 17:7, "and these all do contrary to the decrees of Cesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus." Peter undoubtedly had particular reference to the Roman emperors, but he uses a general term, which would be applicable to all in whom the supreme power resided, and the injunction here would require submission to such authority, by whatever name it might be called. The meaning is, that we are to be subject to that authority whether exercised by the sovereign in person, or by those who are appointed by him.

    As supreme - Not supreme in the sense of being superior to God, or not being subject to him, but in the sense of being over all subordinate officers.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Peter 2:13

    2:13 Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man - To every secular power. Instrumentally these are ordained by men; but originally all their power is from God.