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1 Peter 2:14

    1 Peter 2:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Or to governors, as to them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    or unto governors, as sent by him for vengeance on evil-doers and for praise to them that do well.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And those of the rulers who are sent by him for the punishment of evil-doers and for the praise of those who do well.

    Webster's Revision

    or unto governors, as sent by him for vengeance on evil-doers and for praise to them that do well.

    World English Bible

    or to governors, as sent by him for vengeance on evildoers and for praise to those who do well.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    or unto governors, as sent by him for vengeance on evil-doers and for praise to them that do well.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 2:14

    Or unto governors - By king as supreme, the Roman emperor is meant; and by governors, ἡγεμοσιν, are meant, leaders, governors, presidents, proconsuls, and other chief magistrates, sent by him into the provinces dependent on the Roman empire.

    For the punishment of evil doers - This was the object of their mission; they were to punish delinquents, and encourage and protect the virtuous.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 2:14

    Or unto governors - Subordinate officers, appointed by the chief magistrate, over provinces. Perhaps Roman proconsuls are here particularly intended.

    As unto them that are sent by him - By the king, or the Roman emperor. They represent the supreme power.

    For the punishment of evil doers - One of the leading ends of government. "The Roman governors had the power of life and death in such conquered provinces as those mentioned in 1 Peter 1:1" - Doddridge. Ulpian, the celebrated Roman lawyer, who flourished two hundred years after Christ, thus describes the power of the governors of the Roman provinces: "It is the duty of a good and vigilant president to see to it that his province be peaceable and quiet. And that he ought to make diligent search after sacrilegious persons, robbers, man-stealers, and thieves, and to punish everyone according to their guilt." Again, "They who govern whole provinces, have the power of sending to the mines." And again," The presidents of provinces have the highest authority, next to the emperor." Peter has described the office of the Roman governors in language nearly resembling that of Ulpian. See Lardner's Credibility, (Works, i. 77, edit. 8vo., Lond. 1829)

    And for the praise of them that do well - Praise here stands opposed to punishment, and means commendation, applause, reward. That is, it is a part of their business to reward in a suitable manner those who are upright and virtuous as citizens. This would be by protecting their persons and property; by defending their rights, and, perhaps, by admitting those to share the honors and emoluments of office who showed that they were worthy to be trusted. It is as important a part of the functions of magistracy to protect the innocent, as it is to punish the wicked.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Peter 2:14

    2:14 Or to subordinate governors, or magistrates.