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1 Peter 2:15

    1 Peter 2:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For so is the will of God, that with well doing ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For so is the will of God, that with well doing you may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For so is the will of God, that by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because it is God's pleasure that foolish and narrow-minded men may be put to shame by your good behaviour:

    Webster's Revision

    For so is the will of God, that by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    World English Bible

    For this is the will of God, that by well-doing you should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For so is the will of God, that by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 2:15

    For so is the will of God - God, as their supreme governor, shows them that it is his will that they should act uprightly and obediently at all times, and thus confound the ignorance of foolish men, who were ready enough to assert that their religion made them bad subjects. The word φιμουν, which we translate put to silence, signifies to muzzle, i.e., stop their mouths, leave them nothing to say; let them assert, but ever be unable to bring proof to support it.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 2:15

    For so is the will of God - That is, it is in accordance with the divine will that in this way you should put them to silence.

    That with well doing - By a life of uprightness and benevolence.

    Ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men - See the notes at Titus 2:8. The reference here is to men who brought charges against Christians, by accusing them of being inimical to the government, or insubordinate, or guilty of crimes. Such charges, it is well known, were often brought against them by their enemies in the early ages of Christianity. Peter says they were brought by foolish men, perhaps using the word foolish in the sense of evil-disposed, or wicked, as it is often used in the Bible. Yet, though there might be malice at the bottom, the charges were really based on ignorance. They were not thoroughly acquainted with the principles of the Christian religion; and the way to meet those charges was to act in every way as became good citizens, and so as "to live them down." One of the best ways of meeting the accusations of our enemies is to lead a life of strict integrity. It is not easy for the wicked to reply to this argument.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Peter 2:15

    2:15 The ignorance - Of them who blame you, because they do not know you: a strong motive to pity them.