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1 Peter 2:22

    1 Peter 2:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who did no evil, and there was no deceit in his mouth:

    Webster's Revision

    who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

    World English Bible

    who did not sin, "neither was deceit found in his mouth."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

    Definitions for 1 Peter 2:22

    Guile - Deceit; craftiness.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Peter 2:22

    Who did no sin - He suffered, but not on account of any evil he had either done or said. In deed and word he was immaculate, and yet he was exposed to suffering; expect the same, and when it comes bear it in the same spirit. It is very likely that the apostle mentions guile, because those who do wrong generally strive to screen themselves by prevarication and lies. These words appear to be a quotation from Isaiah 53:9.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Peter 2:22

    Who did no sin - Who was in all respects perfectly holy. There is an allusion here to Isaiah 53:9; and the sense is, that he was entirely innocent, and that he suffered without having committed any crime. In this connection the meaning is, that we are to be careful that, if we suffer, it should be without committing any crime. We should so live, as the Saviour did, as not to deserve to be punished, and thus only shall we entirely follow his example. It is as much our duty to live so as not to deserve the reproaches of others, as it is to bear them with patience when we are called to suffer them. The first thing in regard to hard treatment from others, is so to live that there shall be no just occasion for it; the next is, if reproaches come upon us when we have not deserved them, to bear them as the Saviour did. If he suffered unjustly, we should esteem it to be no strange thing that we should; if he bore the injuries done him with meekness, we should learn that it is possible for us to do it also; and should learn also that we have not the spirit of his religion unless we actually do it. On the expression used here, compare the Isaiah 53:9 note; Hebrews 7:26 note.

    Neither was guile found in his mouth - There was no deceit, hypocrisy, or insincerity. He was in all respects what he professed to be, and he imposed on no one by any false and unfounded claim. All this has reference to the time when the Saviour was put to death; and the sense is, that though he was condemned as an impostor, yet that the charge was wholly unfounded. As in his whole life before he was perfectly sincere, so he was eminently on that solemn occasion.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Peter 2:22

    2:22-23 In all these instances the example of Christ is peculiarly adapted to the state of servants, who easily slide either into sin or guile, reviling their fellowservants, or threatening them, the natural result of anger without power. He committed himself to him that judgeth righteously - The only solid ground of patience in affliction.