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1 Samuel 16:20

    1 Samuel 16:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son unto Saul.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son to Saul.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son unto Saul.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Jesse took five cakes of bread and a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them to Saul by David.

    Webster's Revision

    And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son unto Saul.

    World English Bible

    Jesse took a donkey loaded with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a young goat, and sent them by David his son to Saul.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son unto Saul.

    Definitions for 1 Samuel 16:20

    Laden - Loaded; burdened.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Samuel 16:20

    Took an ass laden with bread - He must send a present to Saul to introduce his son, and this was probably the best he had. Dr. Warburton pleads still farther on the propriety of his rectification of the chronology in this place. David had at this time vanquished the Philistine, was become a favourite with the people, had excited Saul's jealousy, and retired to shun its effects. In the interim Saul was seized with the disorder in question, and is recommended by his servants to try the effects of music. They were acquainted with David's skill on the harp, and likewise with Saul's bad disposition towards him; the point was delicate, it required to be managed with address, and therefore they recommend David in this artful manner: "As you must have one constantly in attendance, both in court and on your military expeditions; to be always at hand on occasion, the son of Jesse will become both stations well; he will strengthen your camp and adorn your court, for he is a tried soldier and of a graceful presence. You have nothing to fear from his ambition, for you saw with what prudence he went into voluntary banishment when his popularity had incurred your displeasure." Accordingly Saul is prevailed on, David is sent for, and succeeds with his music; this dissipates all former umbrage, and, as one who is ever to be in attendance, he is made Saul's armor-bearer. This sunshine still continued till his great successes awakened Saul's jealousy afresh, and then the lifted javelin was to strike off all obligations. Thus we see what light is thrown upon the whole history by the supposition of an anticipation in the latter part of this chapter; an anticipation the most natural, proper, and necessary, for the purpose of the historian. Thus reasons Bishop Warburton, and with very considerable plausibility, though the intelligent reader may still have his doubts.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Samuel 16:20

    16:20 Sent him - This present, though in our times it would seem contemptible, yet was very agreeable to the usage of those times, and to the condition of Jesse, which was but mean in the world. And it seems to have been the custom of those times, (as it is yet in the eastern countries) when they made their appearance before princes, or great persons, to bring a present.