Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

1 Thessalonians 4:12

    1 Thessalonians 4:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    That ye may walk honestly toward them that are without, and that ye may have lack of nothing.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    That you may walk honestly toward them that are without, and that you may have lack of nothing.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    that ye may walk becomingly toward them that are without, and may have need of nothing.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    That you may be respected by those who are outside, and may have need of nothing.

    Webster's Revision

    that ye may walk becomingly toward them that are without, and may have need of nothing.

    World English Bible

    that you may walk properly toward those who are outside, and may have need of nothing.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    that ye may walk honestly toward them that are without, and may have need of nothing.

    Definitions for 1 Thessalonians 4:12

    Without - Outside.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:12

    That ye may walk honestly - Ευσχημονως· Becomingly, decently, respectably; as is consistent with the purity, holiness, gravity, and usefulness of your Christian calling.

    Them that are without - The unconverted Gentiles and Jews. See this expression explained at large on Colossians 4:5.

    That ye may have lack of nothing - That ye may be able to get your bread by honest labor, which God will ever bless; and be chargeable to no man. He that is dependent on another is necessarily in bondage; and he who is able to get his own bread by the sweat of his brow, should not be under obligation even to a king.

    I do not recollect whether, in any other part of this work, I have given the following story from the Hatem Tai Nameh. Hatem Tai was an Arabian nobleman, who flourished some time before the Mahommedan era; he was reputed the most generous and liberal man in all the east. One day he slew one hundred camels, and made a feast, to which all the Arabian lords and all the peasantry in the district were invited. About the time of the feast he took a walk towards a neighboring wood, to see if he could find any person whom he might invite to partake of the entertainment which he had then provided. Walking along the skirt of the wood, he espied an old man coming out of it, laden with a burden of faggots; he accosted him and asked if he had not heard of the entertainment made that day by Hatem Tai. The old man answered in the affirmative. He asked him why he did not attend and partake with the rest. The old man answered: "He that is able to gain his bread even by collecting faggots in the wood, should not be beholden even to Hatem Tai." This is a noble saying, and has long been a rule of conduct to the writer of this note.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:12

    That ye may walk honestly toward them that are without - Out of the church; comp notes on Colossians 4:5. The word rendered honestly, means "becomingly, decorously, in a proper manner;" Romans 13:13; 1 Corinthians 14:40. It does not refer here to mere honesty in the transaction of business, but to their general treatment of those who were not professing Christians. They were to conduct themselves toward them in all respects in a becoming manner - to be honest with them; to be faithful to their engagements; to be kind and courteous in their conversation; to show respect where it was due, and to endeavor in every way to do them good. There are few precepts of religion more important than those which enjoin upon Christians the duty of a proper treatment of those who are not connected with the church.

    And that ye may have lack of nothing - Margin, no man. The Greek will bear either construction, but the translation in the text is probably the correct one. The phrase is to be taken in connection not merely with that which immediately precedes it - as if "their walking honestly toward those who were without" would preserve them from want - but as meaning that their industrious and quiet habits; their patient attention to their own business, and upright dealing with every man, would do it. They would, in this way, have a competence, and would not be beholden to others. Learn hence, that it is the duty of a Christian so to live as not to be dependent on others, unless he is made so by events of divine Providence which he cannot foresee or control. No man should be dependent on others as the result of idle habits; of extravagance and improvidence; of the neglect of his own business, and of intermeddling with that of others. If by age, losses, infirmities, sickness, he is made dependent, he cannot be blamed, and he should not repine at his lot. One of the ways in which a Christian may always do good in society, and honor his religion, is by quiet and patient industry, and by showing that religion prompts to those habits of economy on which the happiness of society so much depends.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:12

    4:12 Decently - That they may have no pretence to say, (but they will say it still,) This religion makes men idle, and brings them to beggary. And may want nothing - Needful for life and godliness. What Christian desires more?