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1 Timothy 1:6

    1 Timothy 1:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    From which some having swerved have turned aside unto vain jangling;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    From which some having swerved have turned aside to vain jangling;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    from which things some having swerved have turned aside unto vain talking;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    From which some have been turned away, giving themselves to foolish talking;

    Webster's Revision

    from which things some having swerved have turned aside unto vain talking;

    World English Bible

    from which things some, having missed the mark, have turned aside to vain talking;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    from which things some having swerved have turned aside unto vain talking;

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 1:6

    Jangling - Foolish, empty talk.
    Vain - Empty; foolish; useless.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:6

    From which some having swerved - From which some, though they have pretended to aim at the τελος, scope, or mark, have missed that mark. This is the import of the original word αστοχησαντες.

    Turned aside unto vain jangling - The original term, ματαιολογιαν, signifies empty or vain talking; discourses that turn to no profit; a great many words and little sense; and that sense not worth the pains of hearing. Such, indeed, is all preaching where Jesus Christ is not held forth.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 1:6

    From which some having swerved - Margin, "not aiming at." The word here used - ἀστοχέω astocheō - means properly, to miss the mark; to err; and then, to swerve from compare 1 Timothy 6:21; 2 Timothy 2:18. It does not mean that they had ever had that from which they are said to have swerved - for it does not follow that a man who misses a mark had ever hit it - but merely that they failed of the things referred to, and had turned to vain talk. The word "which" ὧν hōn, in the plural, refers not to the law, but to the things enumerated - a pure heart, a good conscience, and unfeigned faith.

    Have turned aside unto vain jangling - Vain talk, empty declamation, discourses without sense. The word here used does not mean contention or strife, but that kind of discourse which is not founded in good sense. They were discourses on their pretended distinctions in the law; on their traditions and ceremonies; on their useless genealogies, and on the fabulous statements which they had appended to the law of Moses.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 1:6

    1:6 From which - Love and a good conscience. Some are turned aside - An affectation of high and extensive knowledge sets a man at the greatest distance from faith, and all sense of divine things. To vain jangling - And of all vanities, none are more vain than dry, empty disputes on the things of God.