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1 Timothy 2:10

    1 Timothy 2:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But (which becometh women professing godliness) with good works.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But (which becomes women professing godliness) with good works.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but (which becometh women professing godliness) through good works.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But clothed with good works, as is right for women who are living in the fear of God.

    Webster's Revision

    but (which becometh women professing godliness) through good works.

    World English Bible

    but (which becomes women professing godliness) with good works.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but (which becometh women professing godliness) through good works.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 2:10

    But (which becometh, etc. - That is: Good works are the only ornaments with which women professing Christianity should seek to be adorned. The Jewish matrons were accustomed to cry to the bride: "There is no need of paint, no need of antimony, no need of braided hair; she herself is most beautiful." The eastern women use a preparation of antimony, which they apply both to the eyes and eyelids, and by which the eye itself acquires a wonderful lustre.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 2:10

    with good works}}But (which becometh women professing godliness) with good works - That is, it is not appropriate for women who profess to be the followers of the Saviour, to seek to be distinguished for personal, external decorations. If they are Christians, they have seen the vanity of these things, and have fixed the heart on more substantial realities. They are professed followers of Him "who went about doing good," and the performance of good works especially becomes them. They profess to have fixed the affections on God their Saviour, and to be living for heaven; and it is not becoming in them to seek such ornaments as would indicate that the heart is supremely attached to worldly things. There is great beauty in this direction. Good works, or deeds of benevolence, eminently become a Christian female. The nature of woman seems to be adapted to the performance of all deeds demanding kindness, tenderness, and gentleness of feeling; of all that proceeds from pity, sympathy, and affection; and we feel instinctively that while acts of hardy enterprise and daring in a good cause especially become a Christian man, there is something exquisitely appropriate to the female character in deeds of humble and unobtrusive sympathy and benevolence. God seems to have formed her mind for just such things, and in such things it occupies its appropriate sphere rather than in seeking external adorning.