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1 Timothy 3:5

    1 Timothy 3:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    (but if a man knoweth not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    (For if a man has not the art of ruling his house, how will he take care of the church of God?)

    Webster's Revision

    (but if a man knoweth not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

    World English Bible

    (but if a man doesn't know how to rule his own house, how will he take care of the assembly of God?)

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    (but if a man knoweth not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 3:5

    Church - Assembly of "called out" ones.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 3:5

    For if a man know not - Method is a matter of great importance in all the affairs of life. It is a true saying, He that does little with his head must do much with his hands; and even then the business is not half done for want of method. Now, he who has a proper method of doing business will show it in every affair of life, even the least. He who has a disorderly family has no government of that family; he probably has none because he has no method, no plan, of presiding. It was natural for the apostle to say, If a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the Church of God? Look at a man's domestic arrangements; if they be not good, he should not be trusted with any branch of government, whether ecclesiastical or civil.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 3:5

    For if a man know not how to rule - This is a beautiful and striking argument. A church resembles a family. It is, indeed, larger, and there is a greater variety of dispositions in it than there is in a family. The authority of a minister of the gospel in a church is also less absolute than that of a father. But still there is a striking resemblance. The church is made up of an assemblage of brothers and sisters. They are banded together for the same purposes, and have a common object to aim at. They have common feelings and common needs. They have sympathy, like a family, with each other in their distresses and afflictions. The government of the church also is designed to be "paternal." It should be felt that he who presides over it has the feelings of a father; that he loves all the members of the great family; that he has no prejudices, no partialities, no selfish aims to gratify.

    Now, if a man cannot govern his own family well; if he is severe, partial, neglectful, or tyrannical at home, how can he be expected to take charge of the more numerous "household of faith" with proper views and feelings? If, with all the natural and strong ties of affection which bind a father to his own children; if, when they are few comparatively in number, and where his eye is constantly upon them, he is unable to govern them aright, how can he be expected to preside in a proper manner over the larger household where he will be bound with comparatively feebler ties, and where he will be exposed more to the influence of passion, and where he will have a much less constant opportunity of supervision? Confucius, as quoted by Doddridge, has a sentiment strikingly resembling that before us: "It is impossible that he who knows not how to govern and reform his own family, should rightly govern and reform a people." We may remark, also, in this verse, a delicate and beautiful use of words by the apostle to prevent the possibility of misapprehension. While he institutes a comparison between the government of a family and that of the church, he guards against the possibility of its being supposed that he would countenance "arbitrary" authority in the church, even such authority as a father must of necessity employ in his own family. Hence, he uses different words. He speaks of the father as "ruling" over his own family, or "presiding over it" - προστῆναι prostēnai; he describes the minister of religion as "having a tender care for the church" - ἐπιμελὴσεται epimelēsetai.