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1 Timothy 3:6

    1 Timothy 3:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    not a novice, lest being puffed up he fall into the condemnation of the devil.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Not one newly taken into the church, for fear that, through his high opinion of himself, he may come into the same sin as the Evil One.

    Webster's Revision

    not a novice, lest being puffed up he fall into the condemnation of the devil.

    World English Bible

    not a new convert, lest being puffed up he fall into the same condemnation as the devil.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    not a novice, lest being puffed up he fall into the condemnation of the devil.

    Definitions for 1 Timothy 3:6

    Devil - Slanderer; false accuser.

    Clarke's Commentary on 1 Timothy 3:6

    Fifteenth - It is required that he be not a novice - Νεοφυτον· Not a young plant, not recently ingrafted, that is, one not newly converted to the faith; (old MS. Bible); one who has been of considerable standing in the Christian Church, if he have the preceding qualifications, may be safely trusted with the government of that Church. It is impossible that one who is not long and deeply experienced in the ways of God can guide others in the way of life. Hence presbyters or elders were generally appointed to have the oversight of the rest, and hence presbyter and bishop seem to have been two names for the same office; yet all presbyters or elders certainly were not bishops, because all presbyters had not the qualifications marked above. But the apostle gives another reason: Lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. It is natural for man to think himself of more importance than his fellows when they are intrusted to his government. The apostle's term τυφωθεις, puffed up, inflated, is a metaphor taken from a bladder when filled with air or wind. It is a substance, has a certain size, is light, can be the sport of the wind, but has nothing in it but air. Such is the classical coxcomb; a mere puffball, a disgrace to his function, and despised by every intelligent man. Should we not say to those whom it may concern,

    "From such apostles, O ye mitred heads,

    Preserve the Church; and lay not careless hands

    On skulls that cannot teach, and will not learn."

    From these words of the apostle we are led to infer that pride or self-conceit was the cause of the devil's downfall. In Ecclus. 10 there are some excellent sayings concerning pride: "Pride is hurtful before God and man." "Why is earth and ashes proud?" "The beginning of pride is when one departeth from God." "For pride is the beginning of sin; and he that hath it shall pour out abomination." "Pride was not made for Men." See verses 7, 9, 12, 13, and 18, of the above chapter.

    Barnes' Notes on 1 Timothy 3:6

    Not a novice - Margin, "one newly come to the faith." The Greek word, which occurs nowhere else in the New Testament, means, properly, that which is "newly planted." Thus it would mean a plant that was not strong, or not fitted to bear the severity of storms; that had not as yet struck its roots deep, and could not resist the fierceness of a cold blast. Then the word comes to mean a new convert; one who has had little opportunity to test his own faith, or to give evidence to others that he would be faithful to the trust committed to him. The word does not refer so much to one who is young "in years," as one who is young "in faith." Still, all the reasons which apply against introducing a very recent convert into the ministry, will apply commonly with equal force against introducing one young in years.

    Lest being lifted up with pride - We are not to suppose that this is the only reason against introducing a recent convert into the ministry, but it is a sufficient reason. He would be likely to be elated by being entrusted at once with the highest office in the church, and by the commendations and flattery which he might receive. No condition is wholly proof against this; but he is much less likely to be injured who has had much experience of the depravity of his own heart, and whose mind has been deeply imbued with the spirit of the gospel.

    He fall into the condemnation of the devil - That is, the same kind of condemnation which the devil fell into; to wit, condemnation on account of pride. It is here intimated that the cause of the apostasy of Satan was pride - a cause which is as likely to have been the true one as any other. Who can tell but it may have been produced by some new honor which was conferred on him in heaven, and that his virtue was not found sufficient for the untried circumstances in which he was placed? Much of the apostasy from eminent virtue in this world, arises from this cause; and possibly the case of Satan may have been the most signal instance of this kind which has occurred in the universe. The idea of Paul is, that a young convert should not suddenly be raised to an exalted station in the church. Who can doubt the wisdom of this direction? The word rendered "lifted up" (τυφωθὲις tuphōtheis), is from a verb which means to smoke, to fume, to surround with smoke; then to "inflate" - as a bladder is with air; and then to be conceited or proud; that is, to be "like" a bladder filled, not with a solid substance, but with air.

    Wesley's Notes on 1 Timothy 3:6

    3:6 Lest being puffed up - With this new honour, or with the applause which frequently follows it. He fall into the condemnation of the devil - The same into which the devil fell.