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2 Corinthians 1:9

    2 Corinthians 1:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raises the dead:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    yea, we ourselves have had the sentence of death within ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God who raiseth the dead:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Yes, we ourselves have had the answer of death in ourselves, so that our hope might not be in ourselves, but in God who is able to give life to the dead:

    Webster's Revision

    yea, we ourselves have had the sentence of death within ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God who raiseth the dead:

    World English Bible

    Yes, we ourselves have had the sentence of death within ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God who raises the dead,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    yea, we ourselves have had the answer of death within ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead:

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:9

    We had the sentence of death in ourselves - The tribulation was so violent and overwhelming, that he had no hope of escaping death.

    That we should not trust in ourselves - The tribulation was of such a nature as to take away all expectation of help but from God alone.

    But in God which raiseth the dead - This is very like the business at Lystra; and would be sufficient to fix the apostle's reference to that fact could the time and other circumstances serve.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 1:9

    But we had the sentence of death in ourselves - Margin, "answer." The word rendered "sentence" (ἀπόκριμα apokrima) means properly an answer, judicial response, or sentence; and is here synonymous with verdict. It means that Paul felt that he was condemned to die; that he felt as if he were under sentence of death and with no hope of acquittal; he was called to contemplate the hour of death as just before him. The words "in ourselves," mean, against ourselves; or, we expected certainly to die. This seems as if he had been condemned to die, and may either refer to some instance when the popular fury was so great that he felt it was determined he should die; or more probably to a judicial sentence that he should be cast to the wild beasts, with the certain expectation that he would be destroyed, as was always the case with those who were subjected to the execution of such a sentence.

    That we should not trust in ourselves - This is an exceedingly beautiful and important sentiment. It teaches that in the time to which Paul refers, he was in so great danger, and had so certain a prospect of death, that he could put no reliance on himself. He felt that he must die; and that human aid was vain. According to every probability he would die; and all that he could do was to cast himself on the protection of that God who had power to save him even then, if he chose, and who, if he did it, would exert power similar to that which is put forth when the dead are raised. The effect, therefore, of the near prospect of death was to lead him to put increased confidence in God. He felt that God only could save him; or that God only could sustain him if he should die. Perhaps also he means to say that the effect of this was to lead him to put increased confidence in God after his deliverance; not to trust in his own plans, or to confide in his own strength; but to feel that all that he had was entirely in the hands of God. This is a common, and a happy effect of the near prospect of death to a Christian; and it is well to contemplate the effect on such a mind as that of Paul in the near prospect of dying, and to see how instinctively then it clings to God. A true Christian in such circumstances will rush to His arms and feel that there he is safe.

    But in God which raiseth the dead - Intimating that a rescue in such circumstances would be like raising the dead. It is probable that on this occasion Paul was near dying; that he had given up all hope of life - perhaps, as at Lystra Acts 14:19, he was supposed to be dead. He felt, therefore, that he was raised up by the immediate power of God, and regarded it as an exertion of the same power by which the dead are raised. Paul means to intimate that so far as depended on any power of his own, he was dead. He had no power to recover himself, and but for the gracious interposition of God he would have died.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 1:9

    1:9 Yea, we had the sentence of death in ourselves - We ourselves expected nothing but death.