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2 Corinthians 11:1

    2 Corinthians 11:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Would to God ye could bear with me a little in my folly: and indeed bear with me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Would to God you could bear with me a little in my folly: and indeed bear with me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Would that ye could bear with me in a little foolishness: but indeed ye do bear with me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Put up with me if I am a little foolish: but, truly, you do put up with me.

    Webster's Revision

    Would that ye could bear with me in a little foolishness: but indeed ye do bear with me.

    World English Bible

    I wish that you would bear with me in a little foolishness, but indeed you do bear with me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Would that ye could bear with me in a little foolishness: nay indeed bear with me.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:1

    Would to God ye could bear with me - Οφελον ηνειχεσθε μου μικρον. As the word God is not mentioned here, it would have been much better to have translated the passage literally thus: I wish ye could bear a little with me. The too frequent use of this sacred name produces a familiarity with it that is not at all conducive to reverence and godly fear.

    In my folly - In my seeming folly; for, being obliged to vindicate his ministry, it was necessary that he should speak much of himself, his sufferings, and his success. And as this would appear like boasting; and boasting is always the effect of an empty, foolish mind; those who were not acquainted with the necessity that lay upon him to make this defense, might be led to impute it to vanity. As if he had said: Suppose you allow this to be folly, have the goodness to bear with me; for though I glory, I should not be a fool, 2 Corinthians 12:6. And let no man think me a fool for my boasting, 2 Corinthians 11:16.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:1

    Would to God - Greek, "I would" (Ὄφελον Ophelon). This expresses earnest desire, but in the Greek there is no appeal to God. The sense would be well expressed by "O that," or "I earnestly wish."

    Ye could bear with me - That you would bear patiently with me; that you would hear me patiently, and suffer me to speak of myself.

    In my folly - Folly in boasting. The idea seems to be, "I know that boasting is generally foolish, and that it is not to be indulged in. But though it is to be generally regarded as folly, yet circumstances compel me to it, and I ask your indulgence in it." It is possible also that his opponents accused him of folly in boasting so much of himself.

    And indeed bear with me - Margin, "Ye do bear." But the text has probably the correct rendering. It is the expression of an earnest wish that they would tolerate him a little in this. He entreats them to bear with him because he was constrained to it.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:1

    11:1 I wish ye would bear - So does he pave the way for what might otherwise have given offence. With my folly - Of commending myself; which to many may appear folly; and really would be so, were it not on this occasion absolutely necessary.