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2 Corinthians 11:31

    2 Corinthians 11:31 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is blessed for evermore, knoweth that I lie not.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is blessed for ever more, knows that I lie not.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The God and Father of the Lord Jesus, he who is blessed for evermore knoweth that I lie not.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, to whom be praise for ever, is witness that the things which I say are true.

    Webster's Revision

    The God and Father of the Lord Jesus, he who is blessed for evermore knoweth that I lie not.

    World English Bible

    The God and Father of the Lord Jesus Christ, he who is blessed forevermore, knows that I don't lie.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The God and Father of the Lord Jesus, he who is blessed for evermore, knoweth that I lie not.

    Definitions for 2 Corinthians 11:31

    Blessed - Happy.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:31

    The God and Father of our Lord - Here is a very solemn asseveration; an appeal to the ever blessed God for the truth of what he asserts. It is something similar to his asseveration or oath in 2 Corinthians 11:10 of this chapter; see also Romans 9:5, and Galatians 1:20. And from these and several other places we learn that the apostle thought it right thus to confirm his assertions on these particular occasions. But here is nothing to countenance profane swearing, or taking the name of God in vain, as many do in exclamations, when surprised, or on hearing something unexpected, etc.; and as others do who, conscious of their own falsity, endeavor to gain credit by appeals to God for the truth of what they say. St. Paul's appeal to God is in the same spirit as his most earnest prayer. This solemn appeal the apostle makes in reference to what he mentions in the following verses. This was a fact not yet generally known.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:31

    The God and Father ... - Paul was accustomed to make solemn appeals to God for the truth of what he said, especially when it was likely to be called in question; see 2 Corinthians 11:10; compare Romans 9:1. The solemn appeal which he here makes to God is made in view of what he had just said of his sufferings, not of what follows - for there was nothing in the occurrence at Damascus that demanded so solemn an appeal to God. The reason of this asseveration is probably that the transactions to which he had referred were known to but few, and perhaps not all of them to even his best friends; that his trials and calamities had been so numerous and extraordinary that his enemies would say that they were improbable, and that all this had been the mere fruit of exaggeration; and as he had no witnesses to appeal to for the truth of what he said, he makes a solemn appeal to the ever-blessed God. This appeal is made with great reverence. It is not rash, or bold, and is by no means irreverent or profane. He appeals to God as the Father of the Redeemer whom he so much venerated and loved, and as himself blessed for evermore. If all appeals to God were made on as important occasions as this, and with the same profound veneration and reverence, such appeals would never be improper, and we should never be shocked as we are often now when people appeal to God. This passage proves that an appeal to God on great occasions is not improper; it proves also that it should be done with profound veneration.