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2 Corinthians 13:9

    2 Corinthians 13:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For we are glad, when we are weak, and ye are strong: and this also we wish, even your perfection.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For we are glad, when we are weak, and you are strong: and this also we wish, even your perfection.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For we rejoice, when we are weak, and ye are strong: this we also pray for, even your perfecting.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For we are glad when we are feeble and you are strong: and this is our prayer, even that you may be made complete.

    Webster's Revision

    For we rejoice, when we are weak, and ye are strong: this we also pray for, even your perfecting.

    World English Bible

    For we rejoice when we are weak and you are strong. And this we also pray for, even your perfecting.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For we rejoice, when we are weak, and ye are strong: this we also pray for, even your perfecting.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 13:9

    For we are glad, when we are weak - It will give me indescribable pleasure that I should still appear to be poor, despicable, and destitute of this extraordinary power with which God has clothed me, so that you be strong in all the gifts and graces of the Holy Spirit.

    And this also we wish, even your perfection - We cannot be satisfied that persons, with such eminent endowments, and who have once received the truth as it is in Jesus, should be deficient in any of the graces that constitute the mind of Christ; such as brotherly love, charity, harmony, unity, and order. I have given the above paraphrase to this verse, because of the last term καταρτισιν, which we render perfection. Καταρτισις, from κατα, intensive, andαρτιζω, to fit or adapt, signifies the reducing of a dislocated limb to its proper place; and hence, as Beza says on this passage: "The apostle's meaning is, that whereas the members of the Church were all, as it were, dislocated and out of joint, they should be joined together in love; and they should endeavor to make perfect what was amiss among them, either in faith or morals."

    It is a metaphor, also, taken from a building; the several stones and timbers being all put in their proper places and situations, so that the whole building might be complete, and be a proper habitation for the owner. The same figure, though not in the same terms, the apostle uses, Ephesians 2:20-22.

    The perfection or rejointing which the apostle wishes is that which refers to the state of the Church in its fellowship, unity, order, etc. And perfection in the soul is the same, in reference to it, as perfection in the Church is to its order and unity. The perfection or rejointing of the soul implies its purification, and placing every faculty, passion, and appetite in its proper place; so that the original order, harmony, unity, and purity of the soul may be restored; and the whole builded up to be a habitation of God through the Spirit, Ephesians 2:22.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 13:9

    For we are glad when we are weak ... - We rejoice in your welfare, and are willing to submit to self-denial and to infirmity if it may promote your spiritual strength. In the connection in which this stands it seems to mean, "I am content to appear weak, provided you do no wrong; I am willing not to have occasion to exercise my power in punishing offenders, and had rather lie under the reproach of being actually weak, than to have occasion to exercise my power by punishing you for wrongdoing; and provided you are strong in the faith and in the hope of the gospel, I am very willing, nay, I rejoice that I am under this necessity of appearing weak."

    And this also we wish - I desire this in addition to your doing no evil.

    Even your perfection - The word used here (κατάρτισις katartisis) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament, though the verb from which it is derived (καταρτίζω katartizō) occurs often; Matthew 4:21; Matthew 21:16; Mark 1:19; Luke 6:40; Romans 9:22; 1 Corinthians 1:10; 2 Corinthians 13:11; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 3:10, et al.; see the note on 2 Corinthians 13:11. On the meaning of the word see Romans 9:22. The idea of restoring, putting in order, fitting, repairing, is involved in the word "always," and hence, the idea of making perfect; that is, of completely restoring anything to its proper place. Here it evidently means that Paul wished their entire reformation - so that there should be no occasion for exercising discipline. Doddridge renders it, "perfect good order." Macknight, "restoration." For this restoration of good order Paul had diligently labored in these epistles; and this was an object near to his heart.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 13:9

    13:9 For we rejoice when we are weak - When we appear so, having no occasion to show our apostolic power. And this we wish, even your perfection - In the faith that worketh by love.