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2 Corinthians 5:6

    2 Corinthians 5:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Being therefore always of good courage, and knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So, then, we are ever without fear, and though conscious that while we are in the body we are away from the Lord,

    Webster's Revision

    Being therefore always of good courage, and knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord

    World English Bible

    Therefore, we are always confident and know that while we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Being therefore always of good courage, and knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:6

    We are always confident - Θαρῥουντες ουν παντοτε· We are always full of courage; we never despond; we know where our help lies; and, having the earnest of the Spirit, we have the full assurance of hope.

    Whilst we are at home in the body, etc. - The original words in this sentence are very emphatic: ενδημειν signifies to dwell among one's own people; εκδημειν, to be a sojourner among a strange people. Heaven is the home of every genuine Christian, and is claimed by them as such; see Philippians 1:23. Yet, while here below, the body is the proper home of the soul; but as the soul is made for eternal glory, that glory is its country; and therefore it is considered as being from its proper home while below in the body. As all human souls are made for this glory, therefore all are considered, while here, to be absent from their own country. And it is not merely heaven that they have in view, but the Lord; without whom, to an immortal spirit possessed of infinite desires, heaven would neither be a home nor a place of rest. We see plainly that the apostle gives no intimation of an intermediate state between being at home in the body and being present with the Lord. There is not the slightest intimation here that the soul sleeps, or rather, that there is no soul; and, when the body is decomposed, that there is no more of the man till the resurrection: I mean, according to the sentiments of those who do condescend to allow us a resurrection, though they deny us a soul. But this is a philosophy in which St. Paul got no lessons, either from Gamaliel, Jesus Christ, the Holy Ghost, or in the third heaven, where he heard even unutterable things.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 5:6

    Therefore we are always confident - The word used here (θαῤῥοῦντες tharrountes) means to be of good cheer. To have good courage, to be full of hope. The idea is, that Paul was not dejected, cast down, disheartened, discouraged. He was cheerful and happy. He was patient in his trials, and diligent in his calling. He was full of hope, and of the confident expectation of heaven; and this filled him with cheerfulness and with joy. Tyndale renders it: "we are always of goud cheere." And this was not occasional and transitory, it was constant, it was uniform, it always (πάντοτε pantote) existed. This is an instance of the uniform cheerfulness which will be produced by the assured prospect of heaven. It is an instance too when the hope of heaven will enable a man to face danger with courage; to endure toil with patience; and to submit to trials in any form with cheerfulness.

    Knowing - see 2 Corinthians 5:1. This is another instance in which the apostle expresses undoubted assurance.

    While we are at home in the body - The word used here (ἐνδημοῦντες endēmountes) means literally to be among one's own people, to be at home; to be present at any place. It is here equivalent to saying, "while we dwell in the body;" see 2 Corinthians 5:1. Doddridge renders it, "sojourning in the body;" and remarks that it is improper to render it "at home in the body," since it is the apostle's design to intimate that this is not our home. But Bloomfield says that the word is never used in the sense of sojourning. The idea is not that of being "at home" - for this is an idea which is the very opposite of that which the apostle wishes to convey. His purpose is not at all to represent the body here as our home, and the original word does not imply that. It means here simply to be in the body; to be present in the body; that is, while we are in the body.

    We are absent from the Lord - The Lord Jesus; see the notes, Acts 1:24; compare Philippians 1:23. Here he was in a strange world, and among strangers. His great desire and purpose was to be with the Lord; and hence, he cared little how soon the frail tabernacle of the body was taken down, and was cheerful amidst all the labors and sufferings that tended to bring it to the grave, and to release him to go to his eternal home where he would be present forever with the Lord.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Corinthians 5:6

    5:6 Therefore we behave undauntedly - But most of all when we have death in view; knowing that our greatest happiness lies beyond the grave.