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2 Corinthians 8:21

    2 Corinthians 8:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Providing for honest things, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Providing for honest things, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    for we take thought for things honorable, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For the business has been so ordered by us as to have the approval, not only of the Lord, but of men.

    Webster's Revision

    for we take thought for things honorable, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    World English Bible

    Having regard for honorable things, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    for we take thought for things honourable, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:21

    Providing for honest things - Taking care to act so as not only to be clear in the sight of God, but also to be clear in the sight of all men; avoiding even the appearance of evil. I wish the reader to refer to the excellent note on 1 Corinthians 16:4 (note), which I have extracted from Dr. Paley.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Corinthians 8:21

    Providing for honest things - The expression used here occurs in Romans 12:17; see the note on that place. In that place, however, it refers to the manner in which we are to treat those who injure us; here it refers to the right way of using property; and it seems to have been a kind of maxim by which Paul regulated his life, a "vade mecum" that was applicable to everything. The sentiment is, that we are to see to it beforehand that all our conduct shall be comely or honest. The word rendered "providing for" (προνωύμενοι pronōumenoi) means foreseeing, or perceiving beforehand; and the idea is, that we are to make it a matter of previous calculation, a settled plan, a thing that is to be attended to of set design. In the middle voice, the form in which it occurs here, it means to provide for in one's own behalf; to apply oneself to anything; to practice diligently - Robinson. The word rendered "things honest" (καλὰ kala) means properly beautiful, or comely.

    The idea which is presented here is, that we are to see beforehand, or we are to make it a matter of set purpose that what we do shall be comely, that is, just, honorable, correct, not only in the sight of the Lord, but in the sight of mankind. Paul applies this in his own case to the alms which were to be entrusted to him. His idea is, that he meant so to conduct in the whole transaction as that his conduct should be approved by God, but that it should also be regarded as beautiful or correct in the sight of people. He knew how much his own usefulness depended on an irreproachable character. He, therefore, procured the appointment of one who had the entire confidence of the churches to travel with him. But there is no reason for confining this to the particular case under consideration. It seems to have been the leading maxim of the life of Paul, and it should be of ours. The maxim may be applied to everything which we have to do; and should constantly regulate us.

    It may be applied to the acquisition and use of property; to the discharge of our professional duties; to our contact with others; to our treatment of inferiors and dependents; to our charities, etc. - in all of which we should make it a matter of previous thought, of earnest diligence, that our conduct should be perfectly honest and comely before God and man. Let us learn from this verse also, that ministers of the gospel should be especially careful that their conduct in money matters. and especially in the appropriation of the charities of the church, should be above suspicion. Much is often entrusted to their care, and the churches and individual Christians often commit much to their discretion. Their conduct in this should be without reproach; and in order to this, it is well to follow the example of Paul, and to insist that others who have the entire confidence of the churches should be associated with them. Nothing is easier than to raise a slanderous report against a minister of the gospel; and nothing gratifies a wicked world more than to be able to do it - and perhaps especially if it pertains to some improper use of money. It is not easy to meet such reports when they are started; and a minister, therefore, should be guarded, as Paul was, at every possible point, that he may be freed from that "whose breath outvenoms all the worms of Nile" - Slander.