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2 Kings 15:37

    2 Kings 15:37 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    In those days the LORD began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    In those days the LORD began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    In those days Jehovah began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In those days the Lord first sent against Judah, Rezin, the king of Aram, and Pekah, the son of Remaliah.

    Webster's Revision

    In those days Jehovah began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    World English Bible

    In those days Yahweh began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    In those days the LORD began to send against Judah Rezin the king of Syria, and Pekah the son of Remaliah.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Kings 15:37

    In those days the Lord began to send - It was about this time that the Assyrian wars, so ruinous to the Jews, began; but it was in the following reigns that they arrived at their highest pitch of disaster to those unfaithful and unfortunate people. However much we may blame the Jews for their disobedience and obstinacy, yet we cannot help feeling for them under their severe afflictions. Grievously they have sinned, and grievously have they suffered for it. And if they be still objects of God's judgments, there is revelation to believe that they will yet be objects of God's goodness. Many think the signs of the times are favorable to this ingathering; but there is no evidence among the people themselves that the day of their redemption is at hand. They do not humble themselves; they do not seek the Lord.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Kings 15:37

    The recent invasions of Pul and Tiglath-Pileser had effectually alarmed Pekah and Rezin, and had induced them to put aside the traditional jealousies which naturally kept them apart, and to make a league offensive and defensive. Into this league they were anxious that Judaea should enter; but they distrusted the house of David, which had been so long hostile both to Damascus and to Samaria. They consequently formed the design of transferring the Jewish crown to a certain Ben-Tabeal Isaiah 7:6, probably a Jewish noble, perhaps a refugee at one of their courts, whom they could trust to join heartily in their schemes (2 Kings 16:5 note).