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2 Kings 19:3

    2 Kings 19:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and blasphemy; for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And they said to him, Thus said Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and blasphemy; for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and of contumely; for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And they said to him, Hezekiah says, This day is a day of trouble and punishment and shame; for the children are ready to come to birth, but there is no strength to give birth to them.

    Webster's Revision

    And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and of contumely; for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

    World English Bible

    They said to him, "Thus says Hezekiah, 'This day is a day of trouble, of rebuke, and of rejection; for the children have come to the point of birth, and there is no strength to deliver them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and of contumely: for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

    Definitions for 2 Kings 19:3

    Rebuke - To reprimand; strongly warn; restrain.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Kings 19:3

    The children are come to the birth - The Jewish state is here represented under the emblem of a woman in travail, who has been so long in the pangs of parturition, that her strength is now entirely exhausted, and her deliverance is hopeless, without a miracle. The image is very fine and highly appropriate.

    A similar image is employed by Homer, when he represents the agonies which Agamemnon suffers from his wound: -

    Οφρα οἱ αἱμ' ετι θερμον ανηνοθεν εξ ωτειλης·

    Λυταρ επει το μεν ἑλκος ετερσετο παυσατο δ' αἱμα,

    Οξειαι οδυναι δυνον μενος Ατρειδαο·

    Ως δ' ὁταν ωδινουσαν εχῃ βελος οξυ γυναικα,

    Δριμυ, το τε προΐεισι μογοστοκοι Ειλειθυιαι

    Ἡρης θυγατερες πικ ρας ωδινας εχουσαι·

    Ὡς οξει' οδυναι δυνον μενος Ατρειδαο.

    Il. xi., ver. 266.

    This, while yet warm, distill'd the purple flood;

    But when the wound grew stiff with clotted blood,

    Then grinding tortures his strong bosom rend.

    Less keen those darts the fierce Ilythiae send,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Kings 19:3

    The "trouble" consisted in rebuke" (rather, "chastisement,") for sins at the hand of God, and "blasphemy" (rather, "reproach,") at the hands of man.

    The children ... - i. e., "we are in a fearful extremity - at the last gasp - and lack the strength that might carry us through the danger."

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Kings 19:3

    19:3 The children - We are like a poor travailing woman in great extremity, having no strength left to help herself, and to bring forth her infant into the world. We have attempted to deliver ourselves from the Assyrian yoke; and had carried on that work to some maturity, and as we thought, brought it to the birth; but now we have no might to finish. We have begun an happy reformation, and are hindered by this insolent Assyrian, from bringing it to perfection.