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2 Peter 2:11

    2 Peter 2:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Whereas angels, which are greater in power and might, bring not railing accusation against them before the Lord.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Whereas angels, which are greater in power and might, bring not railing accusation against them before the Lord.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    whereas angels, though greater in might and power, bring not a railing judgment against them before the Lord.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Though the angels, who are greater in strength and power, do not make use of violent language against them before the Lord.

    Webster's Revision

    whereas angels, though greater in might and power, bring not a railing judgment against them before the Lord.

    World English Bible

    whereas angels, though greater in might and power, don't bring a railing judgment against them before the Lord.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    whereas angels, though greater in might and power, bring not a railing judgment against them before the Lord.

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Peter 2:11

    Whereas angels, etc. - This is a difficult verse, but the meaning seems to be this: The holy angels, who are represented as bringing an account of the actions of the fallen angels before the Lord in judgment, simply state the facts without exaggeration, and without permitting any thing of a bitter, reviling, or railing spirit, to enter into their accusations. See Zechariah 3:1, and Jde 1:9; to the former of which St. Peter evidently alludes. But these persons, not only speak of the actions of men which they conceive to be wrong, but do it with untrue colourings, and the greatest malevolence. Michael, the archangel, treated a damned spirit with courtesy; he only said, The Lord rebuke thee, Satan! but these treat the rulers of God's appointment with disrespect and calumny.

    Before the Lord - Παρα Κυριῳ is wanting in a number of MSS. and most of the versions.

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Peter 2:11

    Whereas angels - The object, by the reference to angels here, is to show that they, even when manifesting the greatest zeal in a righteous cause, and even when opposing others, did not make use of reproachful terms, or of harsh and violent language. It is not known precisely to what Peter alludes here, nor on what the statement here is based. There can be little doubt, however, as Benson has remarked, that, from the strong resemblance between what Peter says and what Jude says, Jde 1:9-10, there is allusion to the same thing, and probably both referred to some common tradition among the Jews respecting the contention of the archangel Michael with the devil about the body of Moses. See the notes at Jde 1:9. As the statement in Jude is the most full, it is proper to explain the passage before us by a reference to that; and we may suppose that, though Peter uses the plural term, and speaks of "angels," yet that he really had the case of Michael in his eye, and meant to refer to that as an example of what the angels do. Whatever may have been the origin of this tradition, no one can doubt that what is here said of the angels accords with probability, and no one can prove that it is not true.

    Which are greater in power and might - And who might, therefore, if it were in any case proper, speak freely of things of an exalted rank and dignity. It would be more becoming for them than for men. On this difficult passage, see the notes at Jde 1:9.

    Bring not railing accusation - They simply say, "The Lord rebuke thee," Jde 1:9. Compare Zechariah 3:2. The Greek here is, "bring not blasphemous or reproachful judgment, or condemnation" - βλάσφημον κρίσιν blasphēmon krisin. They abhor all scurrility and violence of language; they simply state matters as they are. No one can doubt that this accords with what we should expect of the angels; and that if they had occasion to speak of those who were opposers, it would be in a calm and serious manner, not seeking to overwhelm them by reproaches.

    Against them - Margin, "against themselves." So the Vulgate. The more correct reading is "against them;" that is, against those who might be regarded as their adversaries, Jde 1:9, or those of their own rank who had done wrong - the fallen angels.

    Before the Lord - When standing before the Lord; or when represented as reporting the conduct of evil spirits. Compare Zechariah 3:1-2. This phrase, however, is missing in many manuscripts. See Wetstein.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Peter 2:11

    2:11 Whereas angels - When they appear before the Lord, Job 1:6, Job 2:1, to give an account of what they have seen and done on the earth.