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2 Timothy 1:6

    2 Timothy 1:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee by the putting on of my hands.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why I put you in remembrance that you stir up the gift of God, which is in you by the putting on of my hands.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For which cause I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee through the laying on of my hands.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this reason I say to you, Let that grace of God which is in you, given to you by my hands, have living power.

    Webster's Revision

    For which cause I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee through the laying on of my hands.

    World English Bible

    For this cause, I remind you that you should stir up the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the which cause I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee through the laying on of my hands.

    Definitions for 2 Timothy 1:6

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on 2 Timothy 1:6

    Stir up the gift of God, which is in thee - The gift which Timothy had received was the Holy Spirit; and through him, a particular power to preach and defend the truth. This gift is represented here, under the notion of a fire, which, if it be not frequently stirred up, and fresh fuel added to it, will go out. This is the precise idea which the apostle had in his mind; hence the term αναζωπυρειν, which signifies to stir up the fire; to add fresh fuel to it. From this it plainly appears, that if Timothy had not continued to be a daily worker with God, he would have received the grace of God in vain. The Latins have a similar metaphor, excitare igniculos ingenii, to stir up the sparks of genius.

    By the putting on of my hands - See on 1 Timothy 4:14 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on 2 Timothy 1:6

    That thou stir up the gift of God - Greek, That thou "kindle up" as a fire. The original word used here denotes the kindling of a fire, as by bellows, etc. It is not uncommon to compare piety to a flame or a fire, and the image is one that is obvious when we speak of causing that to burn more brightly. The idea is, that Timothy was to use all proper means to keep the flame of pure religion in the soul burning, and more particularly his zeal in the great cause to which he had been set apart. The agency of man himself is needful to keep the religion of the heart warm and glowing. However rich the gifts which God has bestowed upon us, they do not grow of their own accord, but need to be cultivated by our own personal care.

    Which is in thee by the putting on of my hands - In connection with the presbytery; see the notes at 1 Timothy 4:14. This proves that Paul took part in the ordination of Timothy; but it does not prove either that he performed the duty alone, or that the "ordaining virtue," whatever that was, was imparted by him only; because:

    (1) it is expressly said 1 Timothy 4:14, that he was ordained by the laying on of the hands of the presbytery, of which Paul was doubtless one; and,

    (2) the language here used, "by the putting on of my hands," is just such as Paul, or any other one of the presbytery, would use in referring to the ordination of Timothy, though they were all regarded as on a level. It is such an expression as an aged Presbyterian, or Congregational, or Baptist minister would address to a son whom he had assisted to ordain. Nothing would be more natural than to remind him that his own hands had been laid on him when he was set apart to the work of the ministry. It would be in the nature of a tender, pathetic, and solemn appeal, bringing all that there was in his own character, age, and relation to the other, to bear on him, in order to induce him to be faithful to his trust. On other occasions, he would naturally remind him that others had united with him in the act, and that he had derived his authority through the presbytery, just as Paul appeals to Timothy, 1 Timothy 4:14. But no one would now think of inferring from this, that he meant to be understood as saying that he alone had ordained him, or that all the authority for preaching the gospel had been imparted through his hands, and that those who were associated with him only expressed "concurrence;" that is, that their presence there was only an unmeaning ceremony. What was the "gift of God" which had been conferred in this way, Paul specifies in the next verse 2 Timothy 1:7. It is "the spirit of power, and of love, and of a sound mind." The meaning is, that these had been conferred by God, and that the gift had been recognized by his ordination. It does not imply that any mysterious influence had gone from the hands of the ordainers, imparting any holiness to Timothy which he had not before.

    Wesley's Notes on 2 Timothy 1:6

    1:6 Wherefore - Because I remember this. I remind thee of stirring up - Literally, blowing up the coals into a flame. The gift of God - All the spiritual gifts, which the grace of God has given thee.