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Acts 10:1

    Acts 10:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of the band called the Italian band ,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, named Cornelius, the captain of the Italian band of the army;

    Webster's Revision

    Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of the band called the Italian band ,

    World English Bible

    Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

    Definitions for Acts 10:1

    Centurion - Commander of a hundred men.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 10:1

    There was a certain man in Caesarea - This was Caesarea of Palestine, called also Strato's Tower, as has been already noted, and the residence of the Roman procurator.

    A centurion - Ἑκατονταρχης, The chief or captain of 100 men, as both the Greek and Latin words imply. How the Roman armies were formed, divided, and marshalled, see in the notes on Matthew 20:16 (note). A centurion among the Romans was about the same rank as a captain among us.

    The band called the Italian band - The word σπειρα, which we translate band, signifies the same as cohort or regiment, which sometimes consisted of 555 infantry, and 66 cavalry; but the cohors prima, or first cohort, consisted of 1105 infantry, and 132 cavalry, in the time of Vegetius. But the cavalry are not to be considered as part of the cohort, but rather a company joined to it. A Roman legion consisted of ten cohorts; the first of which surpassed all the others, both in numbers and in dignity. When in former times the Roman legion contained 6000, each cohort consisted of 600, and was divided into three manipuli; but both the legions and cohorts were afterwards various in the numbers they contained. As there were doubtless many Syrian auxiliaries, the regiment in question was distinguished from them as consisting of Italian, i.e. Roman, soldiers. The Italian cohort is not unknown among the Roman writers: Gruter gives an inscription, which was found in the Forum Sempronii, on a fine table of marble, nine feet long, four feet broad, and four inches thick; on which are the following words: -

    l. maesio. l. f. pol.

    rvfo. proc. avg.

    trib. mil. leg. x.

    appollinaris. trib.

    coh. mil. ITALIC. volunt.

    qvae. est. in. syria. praef.

    fabrvm. bis.

    See Gruter's Inscriptions, p. ccccxxxiii-iv.

    This was probably the same cohort as that mentioned here by St. Luke; for the tenth legion mentioned in the above inscription was certainly in Judea, a.d. 69. Tacitus also mentions the Italica legio, the Italic legion, lib. i. c. 59, which Junius Blaesus had under his command in the province of Lyons. We learn, from the Roman historians, that the fifth, tenth, and fifteenth legions were stationed in Judea; and the third, fourth, sixth, and twelfth in Syria. The Italic legion was in the battle of Bedriacum, fought, a.d. 69, between the troops of Vitellius and Otho; and performed essential services to the Vitellian army. See Tacitus, Hist. lib. ii. cap. 41. The issue of this battle was the defeat of the Othonians, on which Otho slew himself, and the empire was confirmed to Vitellius.

    Wherever he sees it necessary, St. Luke carefully gives dates and facts, to which any might have recourse who might be disposed to doubt his statements: we have had several proofs of this in his Gospel. See especially Luke 1:1 (note), etc., and Luke 3:1 (note), etc., and the notes there.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 10:1

    In Cesarea - See the notes on Acts 8:40.

    Cornelius - This is a Latin name, and shows that the man was doubtless a Roman. It has been supposed by many interpreters that he was "a proselyte of the gate"; that is, one who had renounced idolatry, and who observed some of the Jewish rites, though not circumcised, and not called a Jew. But there is no sufficient evidence of this. The reception of the narrative of I Peter Acts 11:1-3 shows that the other apostles regarded him as a Gentile. In Acts 10:28, Peter evidently regards him as a foreigner - one who did not in any sense esteem himself to be a Jew. In Acts 11:1, it is expressly said that "the Gentiles" had received the Word of God, evidently alluding to Cornelius and to those who were with him.

    A centurion - One who was the commander of a division in the Roman army, consisting of 100 men. A captain of 100. See the notes on Matthew 8:5.

    Of the band - A division of the Roman army, consisting of from 400 to 600 men. See the notes on Matthew 27:27.

    The Italian band - Probably a band or regiment that was composed of soldiers from Italy, in distinction from those which were composed of soldiers born in provinces. It is evident that many of the soldiers in the Roman army would be those who were born in other parts of the world; and it is altogether probable that those who were born in Rome or Italy would claim pre-eminence over those enlisted in other places.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 10:1

    10:1 And there was a certain man - The first fruits of the Gentiles, in Cesarea - Where Philip had been before, Acts 8:40; so that the doctrine of salvation by faith in Jesus was not unknown there. Cesarea was the seat of the civil government, as Jerusalem was of the ecclesiastical. It is observable, that the Gospel made its way first through the metropolitan cities. So it first seized Jerusalem and Cesarea: afterward Philippi, Athens, Corinth, Ephesus, Rome itself. A centurion, or captain, of that called the Italian band - That is, troop or company.