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Acts 10:2

    Acts 10:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    A devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, which gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God alway.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    A devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, which gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    a devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, who gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A serious-minded man, fearing God with all his family; he gave much money to the poor, and made prayer to God at all times.

    Webster's Revision

    a devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, who gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always.

    World English Bible

    a devout man, and one who feared God with all his house, who gave gifts for the needy generously to the people, and always prayed to God.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    a devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, who gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God alway.

    Definitions for Acts 10:2

    Alms - Acts and deeds of mercy.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 10:2

    A devout man - Ευσεβης, from ευ, well, and σεβομαι, I worship. A person who worships the true God, and is no idolater.

    One that feared God - Φοβουμενος τον Θεον, One who was acquainted with the true God, by means of his word and laws; who respected these laws, and would not dare to offend his Maker and his Judge. This is necessarily implied in the fear of God.

    With all his house - He took care to instruct his family in the knowledge which he himself had received; and to establish the worship of God in his house.

    Gave much alms - His love to God led him to love men; and this love proved its sincerity by acts of beneficence and charity.

    Prayed to God alway - Felt himself a dependent creature; knew he had no good but what he had received; and considered God to be the fountain whence he was to derive all his blessings. He prayed to God alway; was ever in the spirit of prayer, and frequently in the act. What an excellent character is this! And yet the man was a Gentile! He was what a Jew would repute common and unclean: see Acts 10:28. He was, therefore, not circumcised; but, as he worshipped the true God, without any idolatrous mixtures, and was in good report among all the nation of the Jews, he was undoubtedly what was called a proselyte of the gate, though not a proselyte of justice, because he had not entered into the bond of the covenant by circumcision. This was a proper person, being so much of a Jew and so much of a Gentile, to form the connecting link between both people; and God chose him that the salvation of the Jews might with as little observation as possible be transmitted to the Gentiles. The choice of such a person, through whom the door of faith was opened to the heathen world, was a proof of the wisdom and goodness of God. The man who was chosen to this honor was not a profligate Gentile; nor yet a circumcised proselyte. He was a Gentile, amiable and pure in his manners; and, for his piety and charitableness, held in high estimation among all the nation of the Jews. Against such a person they could not, with any grace, be envious, though God should pour out upon him the gift of the Holy Spirit.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 10:2

    A devout man - Pious, or one who maintained the worship of God. See the notes on Luke 2:25. Compare Acts 2:5; Acts 8:2.

    And one that feared God - This is often a designation of piety. See notes on Acts 9:31. It has been supposed by many that the expressions here used denote that Cornelius was a Jew, or was instructed in the Jewish religion, and was a proselyte. But this by no means follows. It is probable that there might have been among the Gentiles a few at least who were fearers of God, and who maintained his worship according to the light which they had. So there may be now persons found in pagan lands who in some unknown way have been taught the evils of idolatry and the necessity of a purer religion, and who may be prepared to receive the gospel. The Sandwich Islands were very much in this state when the American missionaries first visited them. They had thrown away their idols, and seemed to be waiting for the message of mercy and the Word of eternal life, as Cornelius was. A few other instances have been found by missionaries in pagan lands of those who have thus been prepared by a train of providential events, or by the teaching of the Spirit, for the gospel of Christ.

    With all his house - With all his family. It is evident here that Cornelius instructed his family, and exerted his influence to train them in the fear of God. True piety will always lead a man to seek the salvation of his family.

    Much alms - Large and liberal charity. This is always an effect of piety. See James 1:27; Psalm 41:1.

    Prayed to God alway - Constantly; meaning that he was in the regular habit of prayer. Compare Romans 12:12; Luke 18:1; Psalm 119:2; Proverbs 2:2-5. As no particular kind of prayer is mentioned except secret prayer, we are not authorized to affirm that he offered prayer in any other manner. It may be observed, however, that he who prays in secret will usually pray in his family; and as the facially of Cornelius is mentioned as being also under the influence of religion, it is, perhaps, not a forced inference that he observed family worship.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 10:2

    10:2 Who gave much alms to the people - That is, to the Jews, many of whom were at that time extremely poor.