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Acts 11:2

    Acts 11:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when Peter was come up to Jerusalem, they that were of the circumcision contended with him,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when Peter was come up to Jerusalem, they that were of the circumcision contended with him,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when Peter was come up to Jerusalem, they that were of the circumcision contended with him,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And when Peter came to Jerusalem, those who kept the rule of circumcision had an argument with him,

    Webster's Revision

    And when Peter was come up to Jerusalem, they that were of the circumcision contended with him,

    World English Bible

    When Peter had come up to Jerusalem, those who were of the circumcision contended with him,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when Peter was come up to Jerusalem, they that were of the circumcision contended with him,

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 11:2

    Contended with him - A manifest proof this that the primitive Church at Jerusalem (and no Church can ever deserve this name but the Jerusalem Church) had no conception of St. Peter's supremacy, or of his being prince of the apostles. He is now called to account for his conduct, which they judged to be reprehensible; and which they would not have attempted to do had they believed him to be Christ's vicar upon earth, and the infallible Head of the Church. But this absurd dream is every where refuted in the New Testament.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 11:2

    They that were of the circumcision - Christians who had been converted from among the Jews.

    Contended with him - Disputed; reproved him; charged him with being in fault. This is one of the circumstances which show conclusively that the apostles and early Christians did not regard Peter as having any particular supremacy over the church, or as being in any special sense the vicar of Christ upon earth. If he had been regarded as having the authority which the Roman Catholics claim for him, they would have submitted at once to what he had thought proper to do. But the earliest Christians had no such idea of Peter's so-called authority. This claim for Peter is not only opposed to this place, but to every part of the New Testament.