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Acts 12:1

    Acts 12:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now about that time Herod the king put forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now, about that time, Herod the king made cruel attacks on the Christians.

    Webster's Revision

    Now about that time Herod the king put forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

    World English Bible

    Now about that time, King Herod stretched out his hands to oppress some of the assembly.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now about that time Herod the king put forth his hands to afflict certain of the church.

    Definitions for Acts 12:1

    Church - Assembly of "called out" ones.
    Vex - To trouble; disturb.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 12:1

    Herod the king - This was Herod Agrippa, the son of Aristobulus, and grandson of Herod the Great; he was nephew to Herod Antipas, who beheaded John they Baptist, and brother to Herodias. He was made king by the Emperor Caligula, and was put in possession of all the territories formerly held by his uncle Philip and by Lysanias; viz. Iturea, Trachonitis, Abilene, with Gaulonitis, Batanaea, and Penias. To these the Emperor Claudius afterwards added Judea and Samaria; which were nearly all the dominions possessed by his grandfather, Herod the Great. See Luke 3:1; see also an account of the Herod family, in the note on Matthew 2:1 (note).

    To vex certain of the Church - That is, to destroy its chief ornaments and supports.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 12:1

    Now about that time - That is, during the time that the famine existed, or the time when Barnabas and Saul went up to Jerusalem. This was probably about the fifth or sixth year of the reign of Claudius, not far from 47 ad.

    Herod the king - This was Herod Agrippa. The Syriac so renders it expressly, and the chronology requires us so to understand it. He was a grandson of Herod the Great, and one of the sons of Aristobulus, whom Herod put to death (Josephus, Antiq., 18, 5). Herod the Great left three sons, between whom his kingdom was divided - Archelaus, Philip, and Antipas. See the notes on Matthew 2:19. To Philip was left Iturea and Trachonitis. See Luke 3:1. To Antipas, Galilee and Perea; and to Archclaus, Judea, Idumea, and Samaria. Archclaus, being accused of cruelty, was banished by Augustus to Vienna in Gaul, and Judea was reduced to a province, and united with Syria. When Philip died, this region was granted by the Emperor Caligula to Herod Agrippa. Herod Antipas was driven as an exile also into Gaul, and then into Spain, and Herod Agrippa received also his tetrarchy. In the reign of Claudius also, the dominions of Herod Agrippa were still further enlarged. When Caligula was slain, he was at Rome, and having ingratiated himself into the favor of Claudius, he conferred on him also Judea and Samaria, so that his dominions were equal in extent to those of his grandfather, Herod the Great. See Josephus, Antiq., book 19, chapter 5, section 1.

    Stretched forth his hands - A figurative expression, denoting that "he laid his hands on them, or that he endeavored violently to oppress the church."

    To vex - To injure, to do evil to - κακῶσαί kakōsai.

    Certain - Some of the church. Who they were the writer immediately specifies.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 12:1

    12:1 About that time - So wisely did God mix rest and persecution in due time and measure succeeding each other. Herod - Agrippa; the latter was his Roman, the former his Syrian name. He was the grandson of Herod the Great, nephew to Herod Antipas, who beheaded John the Baptist; brother to Herodias, and father to that Agrippa before whom St. Paul afterward made his defence. Caligula made him king of the tetrarchy of his uncle Philip, to which he afterward added the territories of Antipas. Claudius made him also king of Judea, and added thereto the dominions of Lysanias.