Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Acts 13:51

    Acts 13:51 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came unto Iconium.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came to Iconium.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came unto Iconium.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But they, shaking off the dust of that place from their feet, came to Iconium.

    Webster's Revision

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came unto Iconium.

    World English Bible

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came to Iconium.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came unto Iconium.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 13:51

    They shook off the dust of their feet against them - This was a very significant rite; by it, they in effect said: Ye are worse than the heathen: even your very land is accursed for your opposition to God, and we dare not permit even its dust to cleave to the soles of our feet; and we shake it off, in departing from your country, according to our Lord's command, (Matthew 10:14), for a testimony against you, that we offered you salvation, but ye rejected it and persecuted us. The Jews, when travelling in heathen countries, took care, when they came to the borders of their own, to shake off the dust of their feet, lest any of the unhallowed ground should defile the sacred land of Israel.

    Came unto Iconium - According to Strabo, Iconium was a small fortified town, the capital of Lycaonia, at present called Cogni. "Lycaonia was a province at the back of Pamphylia, higher up in Asia Minor, and to the northeast of Pamphylia." Pearce.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 13:51

    But they shook off the dust ... - See the notes on Matthew 10:14.

    And came unto Iconium - This was the capital of Lycaonia. It is now called Konieh, and is the capital of Caramania. "Konieh extends to the east and south over the plain far beyond the walls, which are about two miles in circumference ... Mountains covered with snow rise on every side, excepting toward the east, where a plain, as flat as the desert of Arabia, extends far beyond the reach of the eye" (Capt. Kinnear). "Little, if anything, remains of Greek or Roman Iconium, if we except the ancient inscriptions and the fragments of sculptures which are built into the Turkish walls." "The city wall is said to have been erected by the Seljukian sultans: it seems to have been built from the ruins of more ancient buildings, as broken columns, capitals, pedestals, bas-reliefs, and other pieces of sculpture contribute toward its construction. It has 80 gates, of a square form, each known by a separate name, and, as well as most of the towers, embellished with Arabic inscriptions ... I observed a few Greek characters on the walls, but they were in so elevated a situation that I could not decipher them" (Capt. Kinneir). See Colonel Leake's description; and also the work of Col. Chesney (1850) on the Euphrates Expedition, vol. i, p. 348, 349.