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Acts 15:17

    Acts 15:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    That the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called, saith the Lord, who doeth all these things.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    That the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, on whom my name is called, said the Lord, who does all these things.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    That the residue of men may seek after the Lord, And all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So that the rest of men may make search for the Lord, and all the Gentiles on whom my name is named,

    Webster's Revision

    That the residue of men may seek after the Lord, And all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called,

    World English Bible

    That the rest of men may seek after the Lord; All the Gentiles who are called by my name, Says the Lord, who does all these things.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    That the residue of men may seek after the Lord, And all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called,

    Definitions for Acts 15:17

    Gentiles - A people; nations other than Israel.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 15:17

    That the residue of men might seek - Instead of this, the Hebrew has, That they may possess the remnant of Edom. Now it is evident that, in the copy from which the Seventy translated, they found ידרשו yidreshu, they might seek, instead of יירשו yireshu, they may possess, where the whole difference between the two words is the change of the י yod for a ד daleth, which might be easily done; and they found אדם adam, man, or men, instead of אדום Edom, the Idumeans, which differs from the other only by the insertion of ו vau between the two last letters. None of the MSS. collated by Kennicott and De Rossi confirm these readings, in which the Septuagint, Arabic, and St. James agree. It shows, however, that even in Jerusalem, and in the early part of the apostolic age, the Septuagint version was quoted in preference to the Hebrew text; or, what is tantamount, was quoted in cases where we would have thought the Hebrew text should have been preferred, because better understood. But God was evidently preparing the way of the Gospel by bringing this venerable version into general credit and use; which was to be the means of conveying the truths of Christianity to the whole Gentile world. How precious should this august and most important version be to every Christian, and especially to every Christian minister! A version, without which no man ever did or ever can critically understand the New Testament. And I may add that, without the assistance afforded by this version, there never could have been a correct translation of the Hebrew text, since that language ceased to be vernacular, into any language. Without it, even St. Jerome could have done little in translating the Old Testament into Latin; and how much all the modern versions owe to St. Jerome's Vulgate, which owes so much to the Septuagint, most Biblical scholars know.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 15:17

    That the residue of men - This verse is quoted literally from the Septuagint, and differs in some respects from the Hebrew. The phrase, "the residue of men," here is evidently understood, both by the Septuagint and by James, as referring to others than Jews, to the Gentiles the rest of the world - implying that many of them would be admitted to the friendship and favor of God. The Hebrew is, "that they may possess the remnant of Edom." This change is made in the Septuagint by a slight difference in the reading of two Hebrew words. The Septuagint, instead of the Hebrew וירשׁו w-y-r-sh-w, shall inherit, read ודרשׁו w-d-r-sh-w, shall seek of thee; and instead of אדום 'd-w-m, Edom, they read אדם '̇̀̇d-m, man, or mankind; that is, people. Why this variation occurred cannot be explained; but the sense is not materially different. In the Hebrew the word "Edom" has undoubted reference to another nation than the Jewish nation; and the expression means that, in the great prosperity of the Jews after their return, they would extend the influence of their religion to other nations; that is, as James applies it, the Gentiles might be brought to the privileges of the children of God.

    And all the Gentiles - Heb. all the pagan; that is, all who were not Jews. This was a clear prediction that other nations were to be favored with the true religion, and that without any mention of their conforming to the rites of the Jewish people.

    Upon whom my name is called - Who are called by my name, or who are regarded as my people.

    Who doeth all these things - That is, who will certainly accomplish this in its time.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 15:17

    15:17 The Gentiles on whom my name is called - That is, who are called by my name; who are my people.