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Acts 16:20

    Acts 16:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And brought them to the magistrates, saying, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And brought them to the magistrates, saying, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and when they had brought them unto the magistrates, they said, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And when they had taken them before the authorities, they said, These men, who are Jews, are greatly troubling our town;

    Webster's Revision

    and when they had brought them unto the magistrates, they said, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,

    World English Bible

    When they had brought them to the magistrates, they said, "These men, being Jews, are agitating our city,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and when they had brought them unto the magistrates, they said, These men, being Jews, do exceedingly trouble our city,

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 16:20

    Brought them to the magistrates - Στρατηγοις, The commanders of the army, who, very likely, as this city was a Roman colony, possessed the sovereign authority. The civil magistrates, therefore, having heard the case, as we shall soon find, in which it was pretended that the safety of the state was involved, would naturally refer the business to the decision of those who had the supreme command.

    Exceedingly trouble our city - They are destroying the public peace, and endangering the public safety.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 16:20

    And brought them to the magistrates - To the military rulers στρατηγοῖς stratēgois or praetors. Philippi was a Roman colony, and it is probable that the officers of the army exercised the double function of civil and military rulers.

    Do exceedingly trouble our city - In what way they did it they specify in the next verse. The charge which they wished to substantiate was that of being disturbers of the public peace. All at once they became conscientious. They forgot the subject of their gains, and were greatly distressed about the violation of the laws. There is nothing that will make people more hypocritically conscientious than to denounce, and detect, and destroy their unlawful and dishonest practices. People who are thus exposed become suddenly filled with reverence for the Law or for religion, and they who have heretofore cared nothing for either become greatly alarmed lest the public peace should be disturbed. People slumber quietly in sin, and pursue their wicked gains; they hate or despise all law and all forms of religion; but the moment their course of life is attacked and exposed, they become full of zeal for laws that they Would not themselves hesitate to violate, and for the customs of religion which in their hearts they thoroughly despise. Worldly-minded people often thus complain that their neighborhoods are disturbed by revivals of religion; and the preaching of the truth, and the attacking of their vices, often arouses this hypocritical conscientiousness, and makes them alarmed for the laws, and for religion, and for order, which they at other times are the first to disturb and disregard.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 16:20

    16:20 Being Jews - A nation peculiarly despised by the Romans.