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Acts 16:25

    Acts 16:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises to God: and the prisoners heard them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But about the middle of the night, Paul and Silas were making prayers and songs to God in the hearing of the prisoners;

    Webster's Revision

    But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;

    World English Bible

    But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 16:25

    At midnight Paul and Silas - sang praises - Though these holy men felt much, and had reason to fear more, yet they are undismayed, and even happy in their sufferings: they were so fully satisfied that they were right, and had done their duty, that there was no room for regret or self-reproach. At the same times they had such consolations from God as could render any circumstances not only tolerable, but delightful. They prayed, first, for grace to support them, and for pardon and salvation for their persecutors; and then, secondly, sang praises to God, who had called them to such a state of salvation, and had accounted them worthy to suffer shame for the testimony of Jesus. And, although they were in the inner prison, they sang so loud and so heartily that the prisoners heard them.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 16:25

    And at midnight - Probably their painful posture, and the sufferings of their recent scourging, prevented their. sleeping. Yet, though they had no repose, they had a quiet conscience, and the supports of religion.

    Prayed - Though they had suffered much, yet they had reason to apprehend more. They sought, therefore, the sustaining grace of God.

    And sang praises - Compare the notes on Job 35:10. Nothing but religion would have enabled them to do this. They had endured much, but they had cause still for gratitude. The Christian may find more true joy in a prison than the monarch on his throne.

    And the prisoners heard them - And doubtless with astonishment. Prayer and praise are not common in a prison. The song of rejoicing and the language of praise is not usual among men lying bound in a dungeon. From this narrative we may learn:

    (1) That the Christian has the sources of his happiness within him. External circumstances cannot destroy his peace and joy. In a dungeon he may find as real happiness as on a throne. On the cold earth, beaten and bruised, he may be as truly happy as on a bed of down.

    (2) the enemies of Christians cannot destroy their peace. They may incarcerate the body, but they cannot bind the spirit, They may exclude from earthly comforts, but they cannot shut them out from the presence and sustaining grace of God.

    (3) we see the value of a good conscience. Nothing else can give peace; and amidst the wakeful hours of the night, whether in a dungeon or on a bed of sickness, it is of more value than all the wealth of the world.

    (4) we see the inestimable worth of the religion of Christ. It fits for all scenes; supports in all trials; upholds by day or by night; inspires the soul with confidence in God; and puts into the lips the songs of praise and thanksgiving.

    (5) we have here a sublime and holy scene which sin and infidelity could never furnish. What more sublime spectacle has the earth witnessed than that of scourged and incarcerated men, suffering from unjust and cruel inflictions, and anticipating still greater sorrows; yet, with a calm mind, a pure conscience, a holy joy, pouring forth their desires and praises at midnight, into the ear of the God who always hears prayer! The darkness, the stillness, the loneliness, all gave sublimity to the scene, and teach us how invaluable is the privilege of access to the throne of mercy in this suffering world.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 16:25

    16:25 Paul and Silas sung a hymn to God - Notwithstanding weariness, hunger stripes, and blood. And the prisoners heard - A song to which they were not accustomed.