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Acts 17:32

    Acts 17:32 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked: and others said, We will hear thee again of this matter.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked: and others said, We will hear you again of this matter.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, We will hear thee concerning this yet again.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now on hearing about the coming back from death, some of them made sport of it, but others said, Let us go more fully into this another time.

    Webster's Revision

    Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, We will hear thee concerning this yet again.

    World English Bible

    Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, "We want to hear you again concerning this."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, We will hear thee concerning this yet again.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 17:32

    When they heard of the resurrection, etc. - Paul undoubtedly had not finished his discourse: it is likely that he was about to have proclaimed salvation through Christ crucified; but, on hearing of the resurrection of the body, the assembly instantly broke up; the Epicureans mocking, εχλευαζον, began to laugh; and the Stoics saying they would take another opportunity to hear him on that subject. And thus the assembly became dissolved before the apostle had time to finish his discourse, or to draw all the conclusions he had designed from the premises he had laid down. St. Stephen's discourse was interrupted in a similar manner. See Acts 7:54, and the note there.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 17:32

    Some mocked - Some of the philosophers derided him. The doctrine of the resurrection of the dead was believed by none of the Greeks; it seemed incredible; and they regarded it as so absurd as not to admit of an argument, It has nor been uncommon for even professed philosophers to mock at the doctrines of religion, and to meet the arguments of Christianity with a sneer. The Epicureans particularly would be likely to deride this, as they denied altogether any future state. It is not improbable that this derision by the Epicureans produced such a disturbance as to break off Paul's discourse, as that of Stephen had been by the clamor of the Jews, Acts 7:54.

    And others said - Probably some of the Stoics. The doctrine of a future state was not denied by them; and the fact, affirmed by Paul, that one had been raised up from the dead, would appear more plausible to them, and it might be a matter worth inquiry to ascertain whether the alleged fact did not furnish a new argument for their views. They therefore proposed to examine this further at some future time. That the inquiry was prosecuted any further does not appear probable, for:

    (1) No church was organized at Athens.

    (2) there is no account of any future interview with Paul.

    (3) he departed almost immediately from them, Acts 18:1. People who defer inquiry on the subject of religion seldom find the favorable period arrive. Those who propose to examine its doctrines at a future time often do it to avoid the inconvenience of becoming Christians now, and as a plausible and easy way of rejecting the gospel altogether, without appearing to be rude, or to give offence.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 17:32

    17:32 Some mocked - Interrupting him thereby. They took offence at that which is the principal motive of faith, from the pride of reason. And having once stumbled at this, they rejected all the rest.