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Acts 19:21

    Acts 19:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    After these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    After these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now after these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now after these things were ended, Paul came to a decision that when he had gone through Macedonia and Achaia he would go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I have a desire to see Rome.

    Webster's Revision

    Now after these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

    World English Bible

    Now after these things had ended, Paul determined in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, "After I have been there, I must also see Rome."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now after these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 19:21

    Paul purposed in the spirit, etc. - Previously to this he appears to have concerted a journey to Macedonia, and a visit to Corinth, the capital of Achaia, where he seems to have spent a considerable time, probably the whole winter of a.d. 58; see 1 Corinthians 16:5, 1 Corinthians 16:6; and afterwards to go to Jerusalem; but it is likely that he did not leave Ephesus till after pentecost, a.d. 59. (1 Corinthians 16:8) And he resolved, if possible, to see Rome, which had been the object of his wishes for a considerable time. See Romans 1:10, Romans 1:13; Romans 16:23.

    It is generally believed that, during this period, while at Ephesus, he wrote his first epistle to the Corinthians. He had heard that some strange disorders had entered into that Church: -

    1. That there were divisions among them; some extolling Paul, beyond all others; some, Peter; others, Apollos.

    2. He had learned from Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus, whom he saw at Ephesus, 1 Corinthians 16:17; 1 Corinthians 7:1, that several abuses had crept into their religious assemblies.

    3. That even the Christians went to law with each other, and that before the heathens. And,

    4. That a person professing Christianity in that city, had formed a matrimonial contract with his step-mother. It was to remedy those disorders that he wrote his first epistle to the Corinthians, in which he strongly reprehends all the above evils.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 19:21

    After these things were ended - After the gospel was firmly established at Ephesus, so that his presence there was no longer necessary.

    Purposed in the spirit - Resolved in his mind.

    When he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia - In these places he had founded flourishing churches. It is probable that his main object in this visit was to take up a collection for the poor saints at Jerusalem. See the notes on Romans 15:25-26.

    To go to Jerusalem - To bear the contribution of the Gentile churches to the poor and oppressed Christians in Judea.

    I must also see Rome - See the notes on Romans 15:24. He did go to Rome, but he went in chains, as a prisoner.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 19:21

    19:21 After these things were ended - Paul sought not to rest, but pressed on, as if he had yet done nothing. He is already possessed of Ephesus and Asia. He purposes for Macedonia and Achaia. He has his eye upon Jerusalem, then upon Rome; afterward on Spain, Rom 15:28. No Cesar, no Alexander the Great, no other hero, comes up to the magnanimity of this little Benjamite. Faith and love to God and man had enlarged his heart, even as the sand of the sea.